Posts by jon

There May Never be a Perfect Time to Take Time Off – So Just Do It

August 15th, 2018 Posted by Behavior, Blog Post 0 thoughts on “There May Never be a Perfect Time to Take Time Off – So Just Do It”

Even though we were in the heat of redesigning the Plan Canvas software, as well as working on our go-to-market strategy, every member of the small-but-mighty Plan Canvas team took time off over the last 4 weeks. Why would we do such a crazy thing just when things were so hectic?

Because things have been so hectic

The human body and brain are not infallible, perfect machines. They wear down and break down. They need to be refueled. From time-to-time, they need to be shut down for maintenance.

Even if what you do is something you just can’t wait to get up and do all over again tomorrow, you still need to take a break from time-to-time. Imagine you are at an amusement park with one particular roller coaster you simply love. As soon as one ride is over, you race right back into line to do it again.

How many times will you do that before you say, “That’s enough… for now.”

We need variety and we need a break

Every day you should seek a “time out” – to have a chance for your brain to shut down a little. Exercise. Take a nap. Read a book. Play with the dog. Sit on the back porch with your beverage of choice. Something, anything, that is not work. The work isn’t going anywhere. It will be there when you get back.

The same is true of vacation, whether it’s stay-at-home or you actually go somewhere – make it a vacation. Turn off the computer. Put the phone on silent, put it down, or put it away. Eat something you’ve never eaten before. Walk somewhere you’ve never walked before.

Shutting down is valuable

If it’s been awhile since you’ve done that, you have a perfect excuse coming up. Labor Day is just around the corner. Monday, September 3. Most of you will have that day off. If so, do something valuable with the long weekend.

Like shut down and relax a little.

Plan for Success – Focus on Execution

August 1st, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Strategy Execution 0 thoughts on “Plan for Success – Focus on Execution”

Success doesn’t just happen. You have to make it. But first, you have to define what it is.

A note from Jon Umstead:

Plan Canvas is great for startups but it was built with the operations/organization leader in mind – that was the perspective I was coming from when Business is ART was written, and the book subsequently became the impetus for the Plan Canvas software.

Prior to writing the book, my career revolved largely around project planning and management, business planning and management, strategic planning and management, and operational/organizational leadership. In almost every role, it was about planning for success and focusing on execution.

Not one or the other – both!

Plans are worthless. Planning is everything.

I learned very quickly what Dwight D. Eisenhower meant when he said, “Plans are worthless. Planning is everything.”

You can’t just get out there and start executing without a plan if you want to have any measure of success. There are exceptions. You might get lucky. Odds are you won’t.

You can’t devise a plan, set it aside, and start executing like the planning process never happened. That is only slightly better than not planning at all. It’s like buying 10 lottery tickets instead of 1. You increased your odds a little bit, but they are still really bad.

Likewise, you can’t execute to the plan so rigidly that you ignore reality. That is a recipe for disaster – perhaps worse than having no plan at all. Change happens constantly. You and your plans have to change right along with it.

Begin with the end in mind

Planning isn’t just a means to get a loan or attract investors. It’s a method of defining what success means to you and your new business. Beginning with the end in mind. From there, you walk backwards to develop a plan that will get you to your destination.

The plan itself is a best-case scenario given your present understanding of the circumstances and assessment of the risks involved.

“If all goes according to plan, victory is ours!”

But you know without a doubt you missed something, underestimated something, or that you will get blindsided by something that is outside of your control. It’s going to happen. Things won’t go according to plan.

But because you had a plan in the first place, you are aware of alternate routes. You can respond without panicking.

Act tactically – think strategically – get going

And, most importantly, you can act tactically while thinking strategically. You deal in the heat of the moment while keeping your eye on the prize – your definition of success.

Plan Canvas has an all new user interface and a completely redesigned dashboard to show you where you are in the planning process AND how you are executing.

For information and to get started, click on the statement that defines you best:

I am an operations / organization leader.

I am a small business owner.

I am a startup entrepreneur.

I am a freelancer.

I am a church or non-profit.

 

The Entrepreneurial Bug is Often a Childhood “Disease”

July 25th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Entrepreneur, Uncategorized 0 thoughts on “The Entrepreneurial Bug is Often a Childhood “Disease””

On the July 24 episode of the Business is ART podcast, the guest was Travis Pine, President/CEO of Lone Pine Holdings LLC and President/CEO of his new startup, Solstice Innovations, Inc. an insurance technology company that Travis is just now beginning to stand-up.

Early in the podcast, Travis noted that he caught the entrepreneurial bug at an early age, perhaps influenced by his father, who owned several restaurants at the time.

Our unscientific observation is that Travis represents the majority of entrepreneurs. They started a business  as a child or worked in a family business growing up. Many guests on the podcast have said that their parents even encouraged them to start businesses as children – like other parents might encourage their kids to play soccer or take art lessons.

(Listen to the podcast The Life of a Startup and What You Need to Know)

“Entrepreneur” isn’t limited to startup founders/owners

The word “entrepreneur” as used here is not meant to be exclusive to someone who starts her/his own business. Many operate in their professional lives with an entrepreneurial spirit without having any legal or financial ownership in the company or organization.

Some, podcast guests only half-jokingly referred to entrepreneurship as an incurable disease contracted. If most contract it at an early age, shouldn’t it be a priority for educational institutions, government, and employers to teach entrepreneurship at an early age.

In fact, many colleges and universities have already or are moving in that direction.

We need institutional change

See our white paper making a case for for a dramatic shift in institutional thinking – from how we plan to how we manage business plans and strategies.

The best entrepreneur programs according the U.S. News & World Report

According to U.S. News & World Report, the top ten undergraduate entrepreneur programs are at:

  1. Babson College, MA
  2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  3. Indiana University
  4. University of California
  5. University of Pennsylvania
  6. University of Southern California
  7. University of Texas
  8. University of North Carolina
  9. Saint Louis University
  10. University of Arizona

Many more schools, such as Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio and Ohio State University are either launching brand new programs or have just received large donations to enhance their programs.

Meanwhile, high schools are catching the entrepreneurial bug as well by offering programs specifically tailored to the aspiring entrepreneur, and some colleges are recommending specific classes that high schoolers take to better prepare them for collegiate entrepreneur programs.

Numerous private and non-profit programs have also joined the trend. Inc. has posted an article entitled These Nine Organizations are Turning Kids into Entrepreneurs using “startup thinking” as a way to “change how kids learn.”

The movement is real

The movement is real and the Plan Canvas team is proud to be a part of it. Please contact us to learn how we can help support your entrepreneur program.

From Entrepreneur to Student to Career to Entrepreneur

July 17th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Entrepreneur 0 thoughts on “From Entrepreneur to Student to Career to Entrepreneur”

Elise Mayville-Umstead

This week’s blog post is from guest-contributor, Elise Mayville-Umstead, founder of Umstead Farrier Service, Prince George, VA. Some entrepreneurs go into business because they have an idea they want to explore. Others, like Elise, go into it to explore a specific career or passion.

We have divided Elise’s guest-post into 6 key lessons.

A network of support is key

The simplest way to answer how I came to pursue my current skilled trade would be to state that it came to me as a natural progression of interest in horses.

I have always loved horses, from riding, to care, to learning about their behaviors, this passion of mine has been with me since I was in kindergarten drawing stick figure ponies. However, I would be remiss if I did not give credit to my mother for being an amazing role model and to my wonderful husband who has not only supported me every day but made going back to school possible. Both of these people have pushed me to continue to pursue my love of horses and helped me discover how to turn that passion into a career.

Find Your Passion

Click on the Button and Select Plan Canvas for Individual

Do you know what you want out of life and career?

Entrepreneurship often starts at a young age

At age 11, as a young entrepreneur, I began my own pet sitting service complete with an advertising brochure. By 12, I turned my pet sitting business into a multi-service enterprise that included lawn mowing and babysitting. By 16, I had a part time job at a local grocery store and at 18, graduated from high school with enough money to cover my total college books and living expenses.

I attended the University of New Hampshire my freshman year, majoring in Equine Sciences. After a year, I changed my focus, and major, to large animal livestock and transferred to Colorado State University where I graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Animal Science.

Entrepreneurs often excel in other jobs before starting a business

My first job after graduating was in the Swine Industry, where I managed a breed-to-wean hog operation in Nebraska for The Maschhoffs, one of the top three pork producers in the U.S. As manager, I was in charge of 21 barns, 4000 sows and piglets and a team of 7. After a few short months, I was able to increase production by 25% and maintained that status, or more, each quarter for the length of time I was there.

I accomplished this against many obstacles, two of which were that I was the only female on location in a male-dominated industry and I had no prior hog management experience. The hard work never bothered me. From vaccinations, castrations, weaning and much more, I took it all in stride.

From there, I moved to Fort Wainwright, Alaska with my husband, an officer in the U.S. Army. Unfortunately, the Fairbanks area did not have large animal options and after a few years out of the industry I found myself feeling the hunger pangs of needing to be involved in the animal industry once again.

Once it becomes a passion, it’s hard to ignore its call

I remember talking to my mom about future career choices and during the course of our discussion, she suggested combining my love of horses with my science education and farrier work came to mind. At the time, I laughed it off thinking at that point of time in my life, going back to school and making a drastic career change was not in the cards. That all changed when I attended a conference with a friend who is a professional farrier.

After attending the conference, I was hooked. I fell in love with the science; the puzzle to solve and treat the major foot issues a horse can have which affect not only the foot, but the entire body of the animal. The adage, ‘no hoof, no horse’ became my mantra. Once I decided that becoming a farrier was the next step, I began doing research of my own to discover what being a farrier truly meant.

I discovered that a farrier is a “forger, a welder, a toolmaker, and a shoemaker. He/she is an anatomist and a physiologist and treats the symptoms of lameness by developing a forward-thinking plan of action” (The Farrier Guide). I also (not surprisingly) discovered that it is a heavily male-dominated industry.

Know your market opportunity before you begin

I have been around horses most of my life but wanted to know if there were enough horses to be able to make a career for myself and was shocked to discover that according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, there are over 9.2 million pleasure and commercially used horses in the U.S. That’s a lot of feet that require trimming or shoeing every 4-6 weeks.

In May of 2017, I took the leap and applied to an intense 9-month farrier program at Meredith Manor International Equestrian Centre. Short term ‘shoeing’ schools and on-the-job apprenticeships for this career exist, but I needed and craved more and the theory, the experience, the certification, and the heavy forge work that this program offered, was exactly what I was looking for. I’ve had up to 140 animals available to work with, from companion animals to high performance competitors and not only pushed myself in the shop but pushed myself in the classroom. I started study groups and routinely instructed younger classmates, with 100 hours of volunteer time logged in support of my peers and an even greater understanding of my profession.

Understand the problem you are solving at the deepest levels

My efforts to gain a deeper understanding in my profession have yielded many results. I have played critical roles in correcting complex issues with lame or unsound horses, despite having only having 9 months training and experience. During my schooling, I also attended clinics to further my education and network with other farriers. I’ve learned to trim, balance, shoe horses, forge and more. More importantly, I have developed my skills around and under horses, learning more than I ever thought possible about their behaviors, how to care for them and how to educate my peers and clients.

I have finally discovered a career that I love and I am so thankful for my mother and husband for their continued support. Without them, I would not be where I am today.

Need a Coach / Consultant?

Contact us and tell us what you need? Maybe we can help.

Success is Personal

July 11th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Goal 2 thoughts on “Success is Personal”

While recording an episode of the Business is ART podcast (airing Tuesday, July 17 at 7pm), my guest, Donerik Black, and I discussed the importance of knowing what success means to you before launching a business, a career, or taking whatever that next leap of faith may be.

Donerik is a Business Consultant and Managing Partner at Jasper Browne LLC. He is also an entrepreneur himself and is the former director of the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) that was formerly located at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio.

In other words, he has worked with his share of entrepreneurs and has seen a thing or two.

A heartbreaking reality

I shared with Donerik the experience of meeting with some students from Urbana University that had been asked what success meant to them. One of the students explained how much being asked that question meant to him because no one had ever asked before.

The reality is, many people, perhaps most people, are never asked that question, so it is no big surprise that when they ARE asked, they often have no answer that readily comes to mind.

Many of us are just going through the motions – perhaps dreaming about things, but not really having a clear idea of what success means. So it’s also no big surprise that so many people feel less than satisfied with life or their current situation.

It’s personal

Success is personal. Define it on your own terms – no one else’s. Try to think beyond money, toys, and career, although there is nothing wrong with including them in your definition of success.

There is no better time to start than when you are a student just beginning to explore and learn. But there is also no time that is too late to begin.

Plan Canvas provides you with a tool that you can use to begin defining success on your terms.

Plan Canvas for Individual is a free personal development planning and management tool that you can use to pave your way to success in your career, current job, personal/family life, and, optionally, spiritual life.

Start planning today, but begin by defining what success means to you

How to Focus On Today With an Eye On The Future

July 3rd, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Business Plan, Entrepreneur, Goal 0 thoughts on “How to Focus On Today With an Eye On The Future”

We recently received the following email:

“Hello, Mr. Umstead. My name is Tarik Woods. I currently attend Wright State University, studying communications. I am reaching out because I am interested in interviewing you on my talk show [on campus]. I work in the New Media Incubator at Wright State where, this past semester, you spoke to Dr. Ashley Hall’s digital media and writing course students [on creativity at work]. I just finished reading your book, Business is ART, and can honestly say I am inspired.”

Thank you for the kind words, Tarik, but it is the Plan Canvas team that is inspired by students like you.

Focused on today with an eye on the future

School, be it high school, trade school, college, continuing adult education, etc., can be an over-whelming experience. Most students enter school specifically because they envision a future that is full of opportunity and the option to do something important, something that interests them, or both.

But for many, once in school, the tasks at hand, such as studying, getting good grades, and graduating, can become so overwhelming that it is easy to lose sight of the reason for being there in the first place – to create a better future.

But not Tarik.

He is focused on today with an eye on the future. He is putting in the work that he needs to for school, but finding ways to do it that will enable his future – such as the production of his podcast and his radio show, both of which are called “Words With Woods.”

Tarik plans to take the experience he is gaining now and apply it to his career or business post-graduation.

It starts with a vision and a plan

It all starts with a vision and a plan. Even if you feel buried in school work (or your job), it is important to make time to solidify your vision (career, life, business, etc) and begin developing plans for getting there, like Tarik is doing.

You don’t have to plan to be an entrepreneur, but these 6 Steps for Becoming a Successful Student Entrepreneur (from Entrepreneur magazine) provide a great guide for anyone with an eye on the future. They are:

  1. Evaluate your business skills, knowledge and goals.
  2. Find the business idea that suits you best.
  3. Research your competitors (and prepare to crush them).
  4. Make a stellar business plan.
  5. Seek out a helpful mentor.
  6. Register your business, open up shop and rock it.

There are just a couple of slight adjustments we would make to these 6 steps. First, if you are planning to go into business, register your business much earlier in the process. It should be one of the first things you do.

Second, don’t jump straight to a “stellar business plan”. Do this instead of Step 4:

  1. Document your vision, mission, and purpose.
  2. Assess today’s reality.
  3. Develop a long-term strategy for closing the gap between reality and your vision – this can be in the form of a Personal Development Plan, a Business Strategic Plan, or, preferably, both.
  4. When you are getting ready to get serious about launching your business, “make a stellar business plan” that is simple, measurable, and manageable.

Here is a free and easy place to start

Click here to register for Plan Canvas for Individual.

It provides you free access to the Plan Canvas software for developing your very own Personal Development Plan, where you will develop and track long-term, mid-term, and short-term goals and objectives, as well as track the actions you take in order to achieve them.

Contact us if you need the services of a coach/consultant to help you along (a fee applies).

But whatever you do, focus on today with an eye on the future. Make the time. Turn the discipline into a habit.

Yes, You Can!

June 20th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Entrepreneur 0 thoughts on “Yes, You Can!”

Plan Canvas founder, Jon Umstead, recently had the honor of being a guest on entrepreneur coach and author Virginia Phillips’ podcast “Yes, You Can”. Her book Yes, You Can!: Your Roadmap to Dream, Create, and Profit was released earlier this year and is a tremendous guide for anyone dealing with even a hint of doubt.

Virginia asked a lot of great, deep probing questions about the book Business is ART and the Plan Canvas software that is based on it. If you aren’t familiar with the story and what we are all about, Virginia does a great job of guiding you through it, in terms that are meaningful to you.

A few of the highlight points from the interview include:

  • There has to be an emotional connection to the work for it to be effective.
  • Plan Canvas itself is a startup, going through all of the same challenges that all startups experience. The twist is that it is geared at helping startups and small businesses. Our challenge is avoiding the old axiom that the doctor is his or her own worst patient.
  • Plan Canvas is designed to help you organize your thoughts, devise a reasonable plan to close the gap between your vision and reality, and execute to that plan.
  • No one has a perfect story – if they do, they are lying to you.
  • What we really want is for people to take action on the things they say they want to accomplish.
  • Very detailed business plans that focus on the financials serve the purposes of the loan underwriter or capital investor/financial analyst very well – but they don’t help the business owner/leader manage the business.
  • A primary reason to have a simplified plan is focus.

Listen to the interview in its entirety by clicking here.

Airing Our Dirty Laundry – The Absence of a Good Go-to-Market Strategy

June 4th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Uncategorized 0 thoughts on “Airing Our Dirty Laundry – The Absence of a Good Go-to-Market Strategy”

We began the month of May asking a question – what’s holding you back?

If you follow us closely, you may have noticed a few things:

  1. We did not post blogs on a regular basis.
  2. We did not produce new Business is ART podcasts on a regular basis.
  3. We temporarily shut down the Plan Canvas website.

Why? What was holding us back? The answer may surprise you.

We actually weren’t holding back

In actuality, we were holding nothing back, despite outside appearances. So what has been going on?

We’ve been working hard to address a few particular areas of concern, which we will share with you here.

This may leave some of you wondering why we would air our “dirty laundry,” but it is really very simple. Our mission is to improve others’ business and personal outcomes. If others can learn from our mistakes and apply what we learn, we are happy to share.

What have we learned about our go-to-market strategy?

Basically, what we learned was how ill-prepared we were to go-to-market. The Plan Canvas software product was ready, but our go-to-market strategy was not.

As a boot-strapped startup, we put all of our efforts in developing and validating a quality product. These are necessary steps, especially validation. And it is not abnormal for a startup to have no or limited budget to do everything it needs to do – and the same was true for us.

It is not that we ignored sales and marketing. We did a few things, like committing to a social media content marketing campaign. But we consciously put aside a lot of the things we knew we would at some point need to do from a sales and marketing perspective – out of budgetary necessity.

There isn’t anything inherently wrong with that. But what we miscalculated was how much work there would be to do in order to get to an intelligent go-to-market strategy.

What have we been doing?

Before telling you what we’ve been up to, we want to emphasize that it’s never done. Like everything else in business, your sales and marketing strategy is an ever-involving thing.

That said, here is what we have been doing:

  1. Conducted a product “positioning” exercise.
  2. Modified our messaging.
  3. Made a greater distinction between our 3 product lines – Plan Canvas for Individual, Plan Canvas for SMB, and Plan Canvas for Enterprise.
  4. Published a white paper on improving strategy execution.
  5. Documented several Plan Canvas case studies.
  6. Attended entrepreneurial boot camps and participated in pitch competitions.
  7. Modified the plancanvas.net website.
  8. Modified the business model.
  9. Overhauled the Plan Canvas software user interface.
  10. Planned “Launch 2.0” – effectively, a “do-over” from our initial launch in September of 2017.

So what’s next?

Again, this is a never-ending process, and there is a lot more to come. But for the immediate future, we will begin a weekly theme around each of the specific customer types we identified through the aforementioned positioning exercise.

They are as follows:

  • Individual Interested in Self-Improvement – No matter what your title or station in life, you can benefit from a personal self-improvement plan.
  • Freelancer/Independent – You want to earn money doing what you love, on your terms, with the flexibility to do what you want, when you want. There’s just one problem. Reality.
  • Startup Entrepreneur – You have dreams of starting your own business but need to validate if your product or business idea is viable.
  • Small to Midsize Business (SMB) – You enjoy being your own boss, but want to do better, creating a lasting business model with an engaging and enduring company culture.
  • Regional and Franchise Managers with Multiple Locations – You need to spend less time managing individual stores while spending more time managing the area.
  • Operations Manager – You need to better manage change, attract and retain talent, optimize costs, maximize output and grow.
  • Church and Non-Profits – You have all of the same challenges of a for-profit business with one main difference – in addition to fee-based products and services, your mission may be dependent on grants and donations.
  • Midsized-to-Large Enterprise – You need improved outcomes of strategy execution.

We are also working on a group subscription and white label offering. It’s an on-going journey and we hope you join us.

If not, we hope you at least learn from us.

Doing Nothing is a Choice

May 15th, 2018 Posted by Behavior, Blog Post 0 thoughts on “Doing Nothing is a Choice”

In Business is ART, author and Plan Canvas founder, Jon Umstead tells the story of Larry, a former co-worker who used to say, “If at first you don’t succeed, keep on sucking ‘til you do succeed.”

It was Larry’s way of saying that you shouldn’t be afraid to try again. Take the leap of faith that you have learned from past experience, applied that knowledge, and are now better prepared to go after it, whatever “it” is.

Sometimes, we latch on to an idea and, no matter what, we vow to overcome any obstacle to turn that idea into a reality But often, that idea is just a fleeting moment.

Why is that?

Sometimes it just isn’t all that great an idea

The human brain is a marvel. It’s always functioning at levels we cannot understand until it ceases to function altogether. Ideas, imaginings, and creations are invented inside our heads all the time.

How many times do we hear the story of someone who got rich on one simple idea and say, “Why didn’t I think of that?”

Or worse, “I thought of that 10 years ago. That was my idea!”

A lot of the time, the idea is just not that good to begin with. So, we let it go. Other times, it is a good idea but we still let it go.

How come?

Sometimes there is no legitimate path forward

Plans are developed not only to see the path forward, but also to identify the hurdles and road blocks along the way. You then have to make determinations like how to get over or around them and if it is possible to do so.

The trick is in making logical decisions based on reality, versus emotional decisions based on fear.

I can do this – but should I?

It is perfectly normal and even good to have fear, especially when taking leaps of faith. It is not OK to let that fear paralyze you into inaction.

Have you ever been faced with a decision that felt like a speeding truck was headed directly for you? You have no idea what lies on the left or the right side of the road. Jumping to either means jumping into the unknown. But if you continue to stand there, the truck will probably hit you. Unless it swerves. What if you jump left and the truck swerves in the same direction? What if it brakes and stops just short of hitting you?

What do you do? Maybe the jump will leave you in no better condition than had the truck hit you. Maybe you end up in the same condition you were in before you even noticed the truck barreling at you. Maybe you end up in a condition that is far better than the one you just left.

Rarely is there one right answer for any situation. There are simply choices to be made. Doing nothing is one of them.

What’s Holding You Back?

May 2nd, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Inspiration 0 thoughts on “What’s Holding You Back?”

Chapter Two of the book Business is ART is entitled “Refusing to be Constrained by the Shackles of Choreography,” which is an original way of saying, “be original.”

Just because something has been done the same way forever doesn’t mean it’s the best or only way to do it. Innovation and progress are dependent on challenging the norm.

But at its core, Chapter Two is asking one basic, impactful question. What is holding you back?

In a blog post from 1 year ago, almost to the day, we highlighted Laura Harting’s response to that question. Laura was a student at Urbana University at the time.

(see What is that supposed to mean? Nothing is holding me back. 4/27/2017)

At first, Laura found the question to almost be offensive. Nothing was holding her back. Then she thought on it more deeply and realized she actually did have some shackles of her own. Subsequently, she decided to get rid of them, as discussed in the original post.

Laura recently shared an update, and it has been an amazing year for her since shedding those shackles.

Following is an excerpt from her update:

I have always hated and feared change, even as a small child. Without the strategic management class and your book, I would have never been able to embrace change with open arms. 

In July [2017], I accepted a full time job (my first big change of pace) with a staffing agency in Cincinnati as a recruiter. Although I knew this was not my dream job, it was a start in what I thought was my HR passion.  

Just a few weeks into it, an amazing opportunity presented itself and I went out on a limb. I applied for a Graduate Assistantship position at Wittenberg University to pursue a Masters of Art in Athletic Coaching.

Being a college athlete, and coaching summer swim on the side, always made me wonder if there was something more out there in the coaching world. I applied for the position and was offered it not even a week later. I was weary because, as I’ve mentioned before, change has not always been my favorite.

In the back of my mind though, I thought of the book and that looming question, “What is holding you back?”  

I knew that I could not turn down this opportunity and took a leap of faith. I could not be happier that I embraced the new change in my life and went for what seemed somewhat unrealistic at the time. I am thriving and have succeeded as an assistant swim coach with the Men’s and Women’s swim team here at Wittenberg, along with being a student again.

I have even learned that my business degree has been an asset to my success, as running a team is a lot like running a business. 

I wanted to reach out to you and thank you. Like I stated above, if I had not learned to embrace change and realize that I in fact did have things holding me back, I would have never taken this leap of faith that has led me where I am today. Thank you for playing a part in my journey!

Best Wishes,

Laura Harting, Graduate Assistant Coach

Wittenberg University Swimming & Diving

Focusing on the Success of Others

Our purpose is to focus on the success of others. With the book Business is ART as the precursor to the Plan Canvas software, we feel that at least in this one case we got it right. And now Laura is doing the same – focusing on the success of many others. Think of the possibilities if each of us could positively impact just one life. That’s all it takes to exponentially make a difference in the world.

We are dedicating the month of May to the topic “What’s holding you back?” and would love to hear and share your stories as well. Please contact us to do so.

Meanwhile, continued best wished to Laura on her journey. We can’t wait to see where it leads.

Plan Canvas is a community and a powerful software for improving your odds of business success and personal fulfillment.

© SeaSeven LLC 2017.
Developed with FRW Studios.