Posts by jon

Airing Our Dirty Laundry – The Absence of a Good Go-to-Market Strategy

June 4th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Uncategorized 0 thoughts on “Airing Our Dirty Laundry – The Absence of a Good Go-to-Market Strategy”

We began the month of May asking a question – what’s holding you back?

If you follow us closely, you may have noticed a few things:

  1. We did not post blogs on a regular basis.
  2. We did not produce new Business is ART podcasts on a regular basis.
  3. We temporarily shut down the Plan Canvas website.

Why? What was holding us back? The answer may surprise you.

We actually weren’t holding back

In actuality, we were holding nothing back, despite outside appearances. So what has been going on?

We’ve been working hard to address a few particular areas of concern, which we will share with you here.

This may leave some of you wondering why we would air our “dirty laundry,” but it is really very simple. Our mission is to improve others’ business and personal outcomes. If others can learn from our mistakes and apply what we learn, we are happy to share.

What have we learned about our go-to-market strategy?

Basically, what we learned was how ill-prepared we were to go-to-market. The Plan Canvas software product was ready, but our go-to-market strategy was not.

As a boot-strapped startup, we put all of our efforts in developing and validating a quality product. These are necessary steps, especially validation. And it is not abnormal for a startup to have no or limited budget to do everything it needs to do – and the same was true for us.

It is not that we ignored sales and marketing. We did a few things, like committing to a social media content marketing campaign. But we consciously put aside a lot of the things we knew we would at some point need to do from a sales and marketing perspective – out of budgetary necessity.

There isn’t anything inherently wrong with that. But what we miscalculated was how much work there would be to do in order to get to an intelligent go-to-market strategy.

What have we been doing?

Before telling you what we’ve been up to, we want to emphasize that it’s never done. Like everything else in business, your sales and marketing strategy is an ever-involving thing.

That said, here is what we have been doing:

  1. Conducted a product “positioning” exercise.
  2. Modified our messaging.
  3. Made a greater distinction between our 3 product lines – Plan Canvas for Individual, Plan Canvas for SMB, and Plan Canvas for Enterprise.
  4. Published a white paper on improving strategy execution.
  5. Documented several Plan Canvas case studies.
  6. Attended entrepreneurial boot camps and participated in pitch competitions.
  7. Modified the plancanvas.net website.
  8. Modified the business model.
  9. Overhauled the Plan Canvas software user interface.
  10. Planned “Launch 2.0” – effectively, a “do-over” from our initial launch in September of 2017.

So what’s next?

Again, this is a never-ending process, and there is a lot more to come. But for the immediate future, we will begin a weekly theme around each of the specific customer types we identified through the aforementioned positioning exercise.

They are as follows:

  • Individual Interested in Self-Improvement – No matter what your title or station in life, you can benefit from a personal self-improvement plan.
  • Freelancer/Independent – You want to earn money doing what you love, on your terms, with the flexibility to do what you want, when you want. There’s just one problem. Reality.
  • Startup Entrepreneur – You have dreams of starting your own business but need to validate if your product or business idea is viable.
  • Small to Midsize Business (SMB) – You enjoy being your own boss, but want to do better, creating a lasting business model with an engaging and enduring company culture.
  • Regional and Franchise Managers with Multiple Locations – You need to spend less time managing individual stores while spending more time managing the area.
  • Operations Manager – You need to better manage change, attract and retain talent, optimize costs, maximize output and grow.
  • Church and Non-Profits – You have all of the same challenges of a for-profit business with one main difference – in addition to fee-based products and services, your mission may be dependent on grants and donations.
  • Midsized-to-Large Enterprise – You need improved outcomes of strategy execution.

We are also working on a group subscription and white label offering. It’s an on-going journey and we hope you join us.

If not, we hope you at least learn from us.

Doing Nothing is a Choice

May 15th, 2018 Posted by Behavior, Blog Post 0 thoughts on “Doing Nothing is a Choice”

In Business is ART, author and Plan Canvas founder, Jon Umstead tells the story of Larry, a former co-worker who used to say, “If at first you don’t succeed, keep on sucking ‘til you do succeed.”

It was Larry’s way of saying that you shouldn’t be afraid to try again. Take the leap of faith that you have learned from past experience, applied that knowledge, and are now better prepared to go after it, whatever “it” is.

Sometimes, we latch on to an idea and, no matter what, we vow to overcome any obstacle to turn that idea into a reality But often, that idea is just a fleeting moment.

Why is that?

Sometimes it just isn’t all that great an idea

The human brain is a marvel. It’s always functioning at levels we cannot understand until it ceases to function altogether. Ideas, imaginings, and creations are invented inside our heads all the time.

How many times do we hear the story of someone who got rich on one simple idea and say, “Why didn’t I think of that?”

Or worse, “I thought of that 10 years ago. That was my idea!”

A lot of the time, the idea is just not that good to begin with. So, we let it go. Other times, it is a good idea but we still let it go.

How come?

Sometimes there is no legitimate path forward

Plans are developed not only to see the path forward, but also to identify the hurdles and road blocks along the way. You then have to make determinations like how to get over or around them and if it is possible to do so.

The trick is in making logical decisions based on reality, versus emotional decisions based on fear.

I can do this – but should I?

It is perfectly normal and even good to have fear, especially when taking leaps of faith. It is not OK to let that fear paralyze you into inaction.

Have you ever been faced with a decision that felt like a speeding truck was headed directly for you? You have no idea what lies on the left or the right side of the road. Jumping to either means jumping into the unknown. But if you continue to stand there, the truck will probably hit you. Unless it swerves. What if you jump left and the truck swerves in the same direction? What if it brakes and stops just short of hitting you?

What do you do? Maybe the jump will leave you in no better condition than had the truck hit you. Maybe you end up in the same condition you were in before you even noticed the truck barreling at you. Maybe you end up in a condition that is far better than the one you just left.

Rarely is there one right answer for any situation. There are simply choices to be made. Doing nothing is one of them.

What’s Holding You Back?

May 2nd, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Inspiration 0 thoughts on “What’s Holding You Back?”

Chapter Two of the book Business is ART is entitled “Refusing to be Constrained by the Shackles of Choreography,” which is an original way of saying, “be original.”

Just because something has been done the same way forever doesn’t mean it’s the best or only way to do it. Innovation and progress are dependent on challenging the norm.

But at its core, Chapter Two is asking one basic, impactful question. What is holding you back?

In a blog post from 1 year ago, almost to the day, we highlighted Laura Harting’s response to that question. Laura was a student at Urbana University at the time.

(see What is that supposed to mean? Nothing is holding me back. 4/27/2017)

At first, Laura found the question to almost be offensive. Nothing was holding her back. Then she thought on it more deeply and realized she actually did have some shackles of her own. Subsequently, she decided to get rid of them, as discussed in the original post.

Laura recently shared an update, and it has been an amazing year for her since shedding those shackles.

Following is an excerpt from her update:

I have always hated and feared change, even as a small child. Without the strategic management class and your book, I would have never been able to embrace change with open arms. 

In July [2017], I accepted a full time job (my first big change of pace) with a staffing agency in Cincinnati as a recruiter. Although I knew this was not my dream job, it was a start in what I thought was my HR passion.  

Just a few weeks into it, an amazing opportunity presented itself and I went out on a limb. I applied for a Graduate Assistantship position at Wittenberg University to pursue a Masters of Art in Athletic Coaching.

Being a college athlete, and coaching summer swim on the side, always made me wonder if there was something more out there in the coaching world. I applied for the position and was offered it not even a week later. I was weary because, as I’ve mentioned before, change has not always been my favorite.

In the back of my mind though, I thought of the book and that looming question, “What is holding you back?”  

I knew that I could not turn down this opportunity and took a leap of faith. I could not be happier that I embraced the new change in my life and went for what seemed somewhat unrealistic at the time. I am thriving and have succeeded as an assistant swim coach with the Men’s and Women’s swim team here at Wittenberg, along with being a student again.

I have even learned that my business degree has been an asset to my success, as running a team is a lot like running a business. 

I wanted to reach out to you and thank you. Like I stated above, if I had not learned to embrace change and realize that I in fact did have things holding me back, I would have never taken this leap of faith that has led me where I am today. Thank you for playing a part in my journey!

Best Wishes,

Laura Harting, Graduate Assistant Coach

Wittenberg University Swimming & Diving

Focusing on the Success of Others

Our purpose is to focus on the success of others. With the book Business is ART as the precursor to the Plan Canvas software, we feel that at least in this one case we got it right. And now Laura is doing the same – focusing on the success of many others. Think of the possibilities if each of us could positively impact just one life. That’s all it takes to exponentially make a difference in the world.

We are dedicating the month of May to the topic “What’s holding you back?” and would love to hear and share your stories as well. Please contact us to do so.

Meanwhile, continued best wished to Laura on her journey. We can’t wait to see where it leads.

The (Mythical) Steps to Successful Strategy Execution

April 24th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Strategy Execution 0 thoughts on “The (Mythical) Steps to Successful Strategy Execution”

As a Strategy Execution Management (SEM) software and consulting business, the very topic of strategy execution is naturally near and dear to our hearts.

The big question that always hangs in the mist is “How do I get better strategy execution results?”

An article at Entrepreneur entitled “4 Steps to Successful Execution of a Strategy” lists the following keys to success:

  1. Set clear priorities
  2. Collect and analyze data
  3. Keep a rhythm to meetings
  4. Evaluate a strategy

No question. These are smart things to do. In fact we would add a few more such as, but not limited to:

  1. Paint the picture – vision, mission, purpose, goals
  2. Remain flexible

But they aren’t linear steps

We often use the acronym ART (articulate, revise, track). Plan Canvas is based on the ART method defined in the book Business is ART. All of the above “steps” fit neatly into this method as follows:

A – Paint the picture, set clear priorities, keep a rhythm to meetings, evaluate the strategy

R – Remain flexible, evaluate the strategy, set clear priorities, keep a rhythm to meetings

T – Collect and analyze data, keep a rhythm to meetings

But when we say “steps” we imply linear action – one foot in front of the other. In reality, it just doesn’t work that way. Note that some of the items occur in more than one category. For example, “evaluate the strategy” is both in the “A” and the “R” category.

Business (and life) is like a chessboard in which even the pieces you haven’t purposefully moved are, none-the-less, constantly in motion. There is no linear approach to managing such a chessboard – which may be one reason strategy execution success rates are so low…

Too often we apply linear thinking to non-linear realities.

However, the answer is not to ignore linear thinking because that just adds chaos to the non-linear reality. Our suggestion is to use linear thinking as a guideline, but remain flexible enough to shift priorities and change direction as needed – completing each “step” as it make sense to do so.

There are a couple of keys to this

There are a couple of keys to making sure you can do this. First, you have to be able to see the whole chessboard, all of the moving pieces, all of the places they could move, all at once. This is one of the critical reasons for painting the picture. But simply painting it isn’t enough. It has to be constantly on display for stakeholders to see and for you, yourself, to constantly study and refer back to.

In our opinion, the most critical key is to have a company culture that understands the painted picture, is on board with it, and is open to change/flexibility.

An article at Inc. entitled “The Truth About Strategy Execution” provides an excellent example as follows:

“At Salesforce.com, for example, every employee, including managers and senior executives, is required to share his or her goals and the weekly progress toward them with the entire company. Everyone’s performance is out in the limelight, no one can hide. The company’s success is well known, and Salesforce also consistently ranks as one of the most desirable places to work. Employees feel that the company’s unique culture pushes them to deliver their best work. Operational excellence is a boon to employee satisfaction and happiness.”

We put it this way. There is no separation between employee engagement and strategy execution. Strategy must address employee engagement and without employee engagement, strategy execution is much more difficult if not impossible.

That’s why we say the “steps” are mythical

The steps included in this post are important and necessary. But they aren’t linear. Further, in and of themselves, the steps are not a guarantee of success. The true key is as stated above.

That’s why Plan Canvas is different from other tools available. With it you first paint the picture. But unlike classic planning tools, that’s just the beginning. Next and continuously thereafter, you manage the plan.

That plan goes well beyond sales and financials, additionally focusing on company cultural and employee engagement concerns such as the employees themselves, the clients/customers, corporate social responsibility, and operational excellence.

In other words, with Plan Canvas you focus on the entire chessboard, all of its moving pieces, all of the places they can move, all of the time.

Contact us to schedule a demonstration.

One of These Attitudes Will Get You Far

April 17th, 2018 Posted by Behavior, Blog Post, Strategy Execution 0 thoughts on “One of These Attitudes Will Get You Far”

The majority of this post is an excerpt from our soon-to-be released white paper entitled “Strategy Execution Improvement Requires Institutional Change.”

Before getting to it, we would like to add an editorial note to say the title perhaps should be expanded to include, “And it requires individual change as well.”

During a recent demonstration of Plan Canvas, an entrepreneur commented that seeing a list of past due items in a dashboard and receiving an email indicating the item is coming due or is past due would “discourage the user” to the point of inactivity.

If that is really true, perhaps it is no wonder so many businesses and strategies fail.

The ironic thing about it is that the software isn’t telling you what to do…it’s reminding you of what you, yourself, said you’d do, or that you assigned someone else to do it. If you don’t need subtle reminders, you probably don’t need Plan Canvas (or any other tool).

But if you can’t keep it all straight in your head, or through round table discussions over coffee and diet soda, you just might benefit from Plan Canvas.

White paper excerpt

A vast majority of strategic initiatives fail. The obvious reason to be concerned with this is the resulting, tremendous, amount of waste – wasted time, money, effort, energy, and emotion.

The less obvious reason is the immeasurable lost opportunity, taking the form of missed potential to gain momentum, survive and thrive, versus the real potential for loss of market share and extinction of the business.

Saying that we need to do a better job of implementing successful strategies is comparable to saying we need to do a better job at diet and exercise. We know it is good for us, but find doing it difficult and unappealing.

For many of us, it is only after years of unhealthy eating and lack of exercise have negatively impacted our lives that we decide to make a change. At that point, “why” becomes, literally, painfully obvious. Unfortunately, it is often too late to reverse the impacts that could have been avoided in the first place.

The same is true of business and enterprise strategy. An institutional change is in order. Key to that is understanding and acknowledging why it is important, then acting on it before the negative impacts occur.

There are numerous reasons to focus on improving strategic outcomes, but all are a matter of momentum, surviving, and thriving.

Included herein are three critical business success factors, each representing an example of why improved strategy execution is essential:

  1. Cost Optimization
  2. Digitization, Digitalization and Digital Business Transformation
  3. Employee and Customer Engagement

Check your attitudes

The white paper goes on to explain these 3 examples in more detail, why they are each important, and how building them in to your culture or strategy is vital, before further discussing how to improve strategy outcomes.

For an advance copy of the white paper in its entirety, please contact us.

But whatever you do, consider this – there are 2 ways to look at it when viewing a list of things you have yet to accomplish:

  1. Be proud of what you’ve done so far and use that pride as motivation to keep tackling the list.
  2. Be discouraged by the list itself, fold tent and retreat.

One of these two attitudes will get you far. The other, not so much.

If Strategy Execution is a People Problem – Who ARE These People?

April 12th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Strategy 0 thoughts on “If Strategy Execution is a People Problem – Who ARE These People?”

A lot of sources say that the problem with strategy execution is a people problem, not a strategy problem. In fact, an article at Harvard Business Review (HBR) is entitled exactly that.

There is a lot of truth to that sentiment, although, as we have discussed in previous blog posts, we believe that a good strategy considers employee engagement (people) and employee engagement is necessary for successful strategy execution. There is no one without the other.

So is execution really a people problem?

Well…could be…isn’t necessarily…lots of other things could go wrong…but could be. Let’s take the case where it is a people problem – then ask a question.

Who are we talking about when we say “people”?

Managers may be apt to say, “They are! Those people out there on the floor are the problem!”

Those on the floor may be apt to say, “They are! Those people over there in the corner offices are the problem!”

The truth is that it may be both, but it always starts at the top.

A recent request from a reporter

A reporter recently asked, “What are 3 things that are really needed for leading a team?” and we submitted the following as a response:

  1. Vision
  2. Purpose
  3. Plan

If permitted, we would have added a 4th – Determination to execute the plan – and a 5th – Flexibility to modify the plan.

Without any of these things, you can hire employees and be in charge, but you can’t lead (big difference) and you especially won’t be leading engaged employees. If you aren’t leading engaged employees, no amount of determination on your end will lead to successful strategy execution.

Why just count on dumb luck? Why not create luck (and outcomes)?

Did you know there is scientific research to suggest that we have an ability to create luck? Doing some of the things discussed in this post are key.

Formulating and communicating a Vision statement, for example. The Vision helps the leader paint the picture for the business or organization. The leader shouldn’t develop the Vision in a vacuum, but has to own it. With a clear Vision (and painted picture), all stakeholders, including employees, can more readily get on board. If they can see it, they can support it. If they can support it, you don’t have to go it alone. If you don’t go it alone, you are more likely to succeed. You create luck.

Having a sense of Purpose beyond the financial aspects of any business or organization is increasingly crucial as the workforce looks more and more to work for companies that can answer the question “Why are we here?” and help the employees answer their own question of “Why am I here?”

Purpose is the emotional hook that gets everyone excited and engaged. For example, our Mission is to provide tools and expertise to help business owners and leaders achieve greater levels of success, but our Purpose is to help people in general feel less overwhelmed and alone.

But you still need a plan. A Vision without a Plan is just daydreaming. A Purpose without a plan is just passion. Both are great for defining where you want to go and why you want to get there, but you need a Plan to serve as the roadmap for the journey.

That Plan cannot reside in the head of the leader. Again, when everyone knows the Plan, it’s easier for everyone to get on board. Duties are more readily delegated. Expectations are more effectively communicated. Everyone knows if what they are doing is moving the organization toward or away from the Vision. You create luck.

Any finally, a Plan without the Determination to execute to it results in chaos

How many times have you developed a plan, perhaps even started executing on it, but then quickly got distracted and just started responding to day-to-day activities rather than executing to any plan.

To really be effective, you have to plan to manage then manage the plan. Even if the plan changes dramatically on a frequent basic due to realities of the day, the act of planning and re-planning helps keep you focused.

That’s what we do

The Plan Canvas process is more than documenting the Vision and Purpose. It’s more than developing plans. It’s tracking results and outcomes, managing the plans, so that you can be more organized and focused, eliminating as much of the chaos as possible.

Contact us to schedule a demo of the software or discuss our consulting services.

I’m a Small Business – Stop Using Words Like “Strategy Execution”

April 6th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Strategy 0 thoughts on “I’m a Small Business – Stop Using Words Like “Strategy Execution””

One of our missions at Plan Canvas is to take big company business practices and strip them down to their simplest forms so that small business, entrepreneurs, and freelancers can use them to their benefit as well.

Why? Primarily because our purpose is to help others succeed. But more pragmatically, things are just too complicated.

When things are too complex, we don’t do them. Sometimes we can’t. So, we ignore seemingly complex things, knowing that all of the nerdy data and research in the world advises against it.

We unnecessarily put ourselves at increased risk.

What is Strategy Execution?

This article at the American Management Association (AMA) entitled “What is Strategy Execution?” by Ed Barrows does a good job of defining it.

In simple terms, Strategy Execution is envisioning what you want to do, laying out a plan to do it, doing it, seeing if what you’ve done did what you wanted it to do, then keep doing it or change what you do based on what you learned from what you did so that the next thing you do is done better.

But that’ a mouthful!

Honestly, we can’t think of a better way to say “Strategy Execution”

The trickiest part of our purpose is not in simplifying processes, templates, and tools for use outside of the world of large enterprise. We have done that and continue to simplify as we evolve.

The tricky part is saying it in language that small businesses use. That we have not yet mastered. But we are working on it.

Still, sometimes, some terms just make a lot of sense for any sized business – like “Strategy Execution.”

Sure, when we say it, we run the risk of conjuring images of killing an otherwise perfectly good business strategy. But, what we hope to conjure are images of killing it with a strategic approach to business.

Is there any better way to say it?

Somehow, “Let’s kick some butt” just doesn’t seem to do it justice. So, for now, we will stick with “Strategy Execution” and hope that you adopt it as well.

Plan Canvas Can Help

Contact us to for a demo of Plan Canvas or to discuss how our services support your Strategy Execution needs

Do You Know How to Encourage the Heart?

March 29th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Engagement, Leadership 0 thoughts on “Do You Know How to Encourage the Heart?”

On the Business is ART podcast this week at the TrueChat Network, guest Andrea Davis, co-founder and partner at Flashpoint Leadership Consulting, discussed “Leadership’s Impact on Employee Engagement.”

Among the items Andrea discussed was The Leadership Challenge by James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner. First published in 1987 and now in its sixth edition, it has long been one of the gold standards in the study, discipline and art of leadership.

Indeed the book Business is ART and the subsequent business planning and strategic management software Plan Canvas have some of their roots in Kouzes’ and Posners’ 5 leadership practices.

5 Practices of Leaders

Those practices include:

  1. Model the way
  2. Inspire a shared vision
  3. Challenge the process
  4. Enable others to act
  5. Encourage the heart

Where Leadership Often Falls Short

Leaders, managers, supervisors and entrepreneurs often put their heads down and start making a mad dash forward, thinking the sprint will put them ahead of game. This mad dash makes it easy to forget any or all of the 5 practices of leaders, but the one that is often forgotten, even in the slow walk, is the fifth one – encourage the heart.

Yet, arguably, it is the most vital in creating a company culture / environment that creates and nurtures employee engagement. It is so much easier for an employee to be engaged in their work and in their employer’s business when their heart is encouraged.

What Does it Mean to Encourage the Heart?

“Encouraging the heart” goes beyond words.

Words like “you know I care about you, right?” and “you’re doing really great work” are important – vital. But they are perceived as insincere, empty, and even offensive when they are not backed by action, or worse, backed by action that is to the contrary.

As a leader, it isn’t good enough to say you aren’t good at this stuff. You have an obligation to get better at it.

Those who follow want more. They need more. You have to learn to encourage the heart, even if it is a difficult, unnatural thing for you to do. If not, you will lose them.

Consider These Options

If working on your ability to encourage from the heart is a priority, Plan Canvas has a number of options for you to consider. Here are two of them:

  • Register for Plan Canvas for Individuals at no cost to develop and continually work on a personal development plan. We do recommend you work with a coach on your personal plan.
  • Join others in our online, monthly mastermind / peer group where we tackle one another’s business and personal challenges while holding each other accountable to the actions we agree to take. In addition to the monthly online group meeting, it includes 1-to-1 consulting and a subscription to the Plan Canvas for SMB Contact us for a free initial consultation. $169/month.

And of course, if you are looking for much more comprehensive leadership consulting that includes all 5 practices identified in The Leadership Challenge and more, contact Andrea at Flashpoint Leadership Consulting.

Note: No one at Plan Canvas is a paid spokesperson for Flashpoint – we just think they are really good at what they do, and are happy to share their information.

Why Your Vision Statement Matters

March 21st, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Strategy, Uncategorized, Vision 0 thoughts on “Why Your Vision Statement Matters”

A March 21, 2017 article at Entrepreneur entitled “How To Engage Employees Through Your Company Vision Statement” by Andre Lavoie sites a study that found “60% of employees didn’t know their company’s vision.”

Yet, an understanding of and appreciation for the Vision and Strategies is an integral part to both improving employee engagement (approximately 30%) and the successful implementation of Strategic Initiatives (also about 30%).

So it stands to reason that we should be doing a better job of defining and communicating Vision.

An excerpt from an up-coming white paper

The following is an excerpt from a white paper that we are publishing in early April on how to improve strategy execution and why it’s critical to business survival.

Strategy Execution Improvement

Critical Success Factors to Surviving and Thriving

Order a pre-release copy of our upcoming white paper on how to improve strategy execution.

Vision is how you see things in the ideal future. The Mission is often mistaken for or sometimes blended into the Vision Statement, but they are two separate things. While the Vision is how you see things, the Mission is what you do.

Amazon’s is as an example of a well-written, combined, Vision and Mission Statement, as follows:

“Our vision is to be Earth’s most customer-centric company; to build a place where people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online.”

The Vision is to be Earth’s most customer-centric company. The Mission is to build a place people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online.

Note that in neither the Vision nor the Mission Statement does Amazon mention how they will get there, nor what that “place” looks like. Amazon can change its business model, how it serves customers, and enabling technology at will – without changing the Vision and Mission.

Think of it as remodeling the house without replacing the foundation.

Compare that to Walmart’s Vision Statement

Compare that to Walmart’s Vision Statement, “To be the best retailer in the hearts and minds of consumers and employees,” and their Mission Statement, “Saving people money so they can live better.”

These statements aren’t inherently wrong, but they do generate perceptions that are not necessarily positive, such as:

  • Now a classic retailer, always a classic retailer
  • It might be the best, but I still don’t like it
  • I can only live better by saving money – and purchasing lower quality items

“A Walmart on every corner” is increasingly a losing proposition that may not be dying, but is not well positioned to thrive against an Amazon.

Perhaps some of the reason for that is rooted in their Vision and Mission statements.

10 Ways to Create Disengaged Employees

March 14th, 2018 Posted by Behavior, Blog Post, Engagement, Leadership 0 thoughts on “10 Ways to Create Disengaged Employees”

It’s easy to find advice on how to improve employee engagement, some good, some useless. Here are some ways to create DISENGAGED employees. Our advice? Don’t do the things listed here.

Plan Canvas is a community and a powerful software for improving your odds of business success and personal fulfillment.

© SeaSeven LLC 2017.
Developed with FRW Studios.