Posts in Blog Post

How To Stay True And Be Of Value

December 11th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Strategic Planning, Strategy Execution 0 thoughts on “How To Stay True And Be Of Value”

An article at Inc. entitled “How to stand out with your holiday messaging” suggests 3 major things for businesses to keep in mind during the holiday season, summarized as follows:

  1. Express gratitude
  2. Stay loyal to the brand
  3. Be of value

It is in that spirit this post was created. Be sure to stay with it through the 3rd main section, “Be of value”.

Express Gratitude

The Plan Canvas team is grateful to a large number of individuals and businesses this year for a variety of reasons. We are appreciative of every single one of them, but some of those deserving special acknowledgement include:

Stay Loyal to the Brand

The Plan Canvas software was founded on a mission to help others be more successful. At its core, that is what it is all about. It is digitalized central hub for what is important to you and your business. It gets you organized. It is a method to define what success means to you, in your terms, lay out targets and a plan for getting there, and managing that plan by measuring progress and making appropriate adjustments – on-going, in a simplified, logical fashion.

Our team wishes you and yours great success in whatever it is you endeavor. To that end…

Be of Value

…just for visiting our website and reading this blog, we are offering a holiday season gift from our team to yours.

We are serious about our mission, and so, from now through December 31, 2018, email us at info@plancanvas.net and we will provide you with free limited engagement consulting services and a free 3-month subscription to Plan Canvas. Depending on the size of your business, that is minimally a combined $200 value.

No Strings Attached – None

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from Plan Canvas. We hope you take us up on this offer, and wish you the very best!

How “My Fitness Pal” Applies to Business

October 31st, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Business Plan, Strategic Planning, Strategy Execution, Uncategorized 0 thoughts on “How “My Fitness Pal” Applies to Business”

The popular app “My Fitness Pal” has about 20 million subscribers.

You start using it by describing a little about yourself. Nothing too detailed. Just some basics like height, age, weight, etc. Next, you define some goals that aren’t limited to reaching and maintaining an ideal weight.

That’s part of it. But to lay out a fitness plan, you have to set some specific short-term objectives in a number of categories that include activity, nutritional balance, hydration and calories.

There is a psychology involved

When you use the app regularly, you pay closer attention to your behavior. When you pay attention to your behavior, you begin to adjust accordingly.

The short-term objectives become almost like competitive challenges. Meeting or exceeding them becomes motivation to keep at it. Next thing you know, you can see and feel results.

If you stop using it, however, chances are good you will slip right back into the behaviors that led you to sign up for the app in the first place. Stick with it and you find yourself meeting or exceeding longer term objectives and goals.

That all makes sense, right? Right.

Apply the same principles to business

My Fitness Pal is effectively a Strategy Execution Management (SEM) tool that is focused on fitness. Plan Canvas is an SEM tool that is focused on business. But they are otherwise, conceptually, the same.

For example, when developing business strategy and plans, you start by describing your business, much like you described yourself when you begin using My Fitness Pal. You don’t have to get too detailed. Just talk about things like how the business is structured, where it operates, what its target markets are, and what products/services it provides.

Next, you begin envisioning the future and setting some goals and objectives. Just as My Fitness Pal is not all about weight, plans you develop in Plan Canvas are not all about financials. There are other things to consider, such as social responsibility, employees, and customers.

This is all good stuff when it comes to planning. But just like with My Fitness Pal, goals and objectives don’t complete themselves. You have to complete them. And just like logging your regular accomplishments in My Fitness Pal, you track and log your actual business results in Plan Canvas – all for the same reasons. Observation, adjustment, and motivation. When you do this on a regular basis, poor habits begin to fade away as more productive habits take hold.

Get started!

Subscribe to the Plan Canvas Software for just $15/month

So why don’t we do it?

Why doesn’t everyone use My Fitness Pal and why doesn’t everyone who downloads it stick with it? Frankly, pizza tastes good and the couch is pretty comfortable. It’s just too easy not to. Some may not even know how to.

The same is true of business strategy planning and execution.

But the sobering reality is that a lack of formal planning – simplified and actionable plans – is a leading cause of business failures.

Not enough reality? How’s this. Half of all startups cease to exist within 5 years. Formal planning and execution practices (as we’ve defined it) doubles the odds of success. Still not enough? How’s this. Those who have made it beyond startup phase fair, on average, 33% better than their peers and competitors when formal planning and execution practices are in place.

Finally, even though you use My Fitness Pal, sometimes you still need a fitness trainer to help keep you focused. Similarly, in business, sometimes you need a consultant to help keep you focused.

Think of Plan Canvas as your “My Fitness Pal” tool for your business. It’s just a tool. You have to use it to get results. If you’re disciplined enough to use it on your own, great! If not, we have you covered.

Contact us for a demo or to discuss consulting options.

Out of the Darkness – Suicide Prevention

September 28th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Engagement 0 thoughts on “Out of the Darkness – Suicide Prevention”

We are taking a break from typical business topics in this blog post and instead focusing on the subject of suicide, beginning with some alarming statistics. Here are some according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP):

  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S.
  • Each year, nearly 45,000 people die by suicide
  • For every suicide, 25 others attempt it
  • Suicide costs the U.S. $69 billion each year
  • The annual age-adjusted suicide rate is 13.42 per 100,000 individuals.
  • Men die by suicide 3.53x more often than women.
  • On average, there are 123 suicides per day.
  • White males accounted for 7 of 10 suicides in 2016.
  • Firearms account for 51% of all suicides in 2016.
  • The rate of suicide is highest in middle age — white men in particular.

The AFSP also provides the following map, in which the darker shades indicate higher rates of suicide per state:

Get Involved

Two of the ways we can work to lower the rate of suicide is to better recognize the signs and create an environment in which it is OK for people to talk about their issues, worries, and feelings – without fear of stigma or retribution. The best way we can do that is through learning. The best way we can learn and support learning is by getting involved.

There are all kinds of options for doing so.

For example, we are participating as a family in an upcoming event called “Out of the Darkness Community Walks” which take place all over the country.

According to their website, the AFSP says, “When you walk in the Out of the Darkness Walks, you join the effort with hundreds of thousands of people to raise awareness and funds that allow the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) to invest in new research, create educational programs, advocate for public policy, and support survivors of suicide loss.

Thanks to Walkers and Donors like you, AFSP has been able to set a goal to reduce the annual suicide rate 20% by 2025.”

Don’t Wait for Suicide to Impact You

If suicide has never impacted your life, we could not be more happy for you. Let’s keep it that way. Don’t wait until it does, and help the rest of us heal.

Get involved. Get educated. Get out of the darkness.

Share the Good Things You Do – Just Don’t Cheapen It

September 11th, 2018 Posted by Behavior, Blog Post, Inspiration 0 thoughts on “Share the Good Things You Do – Just Don’t Cheapen It”

At work or in your business, how do you share the good things you do outside of it, that benefit others, without making it sound like a cheap marketing ploy?

On a recent episode of the Business is ART podcast at the TrueChat Network, guest Joseph Lewin discussed the importance of having a business identity. He also discussed how it differs from, but relates to, brand identity.

(listen to the podcast in its entirety by clicking here)

Support your story by defining social responsibility goals and objectives.

Don’t have a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) plan for your business? You can use Plan Canvas to identify strategic CRM goals and and objectives. We help you by providing the category and a few examples to include in your Strategic and Business Plans. See previous blog post entitled “The Difference Between Goals, Strategic Objectives and Tactical Objectives.”

Share Without Making It About Yourself

Early in the show, the discussion turned to telling your personal story as part of your business identity, if not your brand identity, without cheapening it or making it painfully obvious that even though you do good things for others, you might be doing them for the wrong reasons.

In other words, how do you share the fact that you help others without making it about self-promotion? Here are a few ideas:

  1. Create a separate web page specifically designed to tell your story-  or to highlight your corporate social responsibility (CSR) program.
  2. Spend a minimum amount of time discussing why the cause is important to you.
  3. Spend more time discussing why it is important to the benefactor(s) of your good works.
  4. Spend even more time discussing why it is important to anyone listening, reading, watching, etc.
  5. Avoid or minimize use of the words “I” and “me” – use words like “we” and “you” more frequently.
  6. Keep the selfies to a minimum – focus on others. If you find you or your image is the star of the show, you missed the boat. An exception may be if you are making a personal appeal for others to support the same good works or cause, but even then, make it about others, not yourself.

Above all…BE SINCERE

It’s easy to smell a rat. Helping others is not about your ego. Be sincere about what you are doing. Don’t do it to showboat. You can show your customers how awesome you are by providing them with great products and services.

That said, the good works that you do are part of what makes you the person that you are, or the business that you represent.

Tell the story. Just be mindful of the focus.

The Difference Between Goals, Strategic Objectives, and Tactical Objectives

August 28th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Goal, Uncategorized 1 thought on “The Difference Between Goals, Strategic Objectives, and Tactical Objectives”

There’s rarely ONE correct answer. Ask 10 different experts and you will get 10 different answers. That seems to be true of many things – and so it goes with terms like goals, objectives, strategic objectives, and tactical objectives.

Here is our take on these particular terms.

Goals are big, lofty things

Goals are big, lofty things that look out into the future, in support of the overall vision. If they lean 1 way or the other, it would be slightly more toward the idealistic rather than the realistic (although there should be a healthy dose of each in every defined goal).

Goals are more of a destination and are, therefore, largely immeasurable in-and-of themselves beyond answering the question, “Are we there yet?”

There are 4 major categories of goals. Pretty much anything you can imagine as a goal for your business will fit neatly into at least one of them. They are:

  1. Goals relative to social responsibility
  2. Goals relative to employee engagement
  3. Goals relative to customer/client engagement
  4. Goals relative to profitability

Goals are a foundational component of a long-term strategic plan. They are defined right after you define your vision, mission, and purpose.

Objectives help you measure progress

If goals are largely immeasurable beyond the destination, how do you know what progress you are making toward them? Objectives. They represent specific outcomes you need to achieve in order to move closer to your goals. One objective can support multiple goals.

Objectives have 5 primary characteristics that are easily remembered using the SMART acronym. A well-defined objective is:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Achievable
  • Realistic
  • Time-bound

Start defining and tracking YOUR goals, strategic objectives, and tactical objectives today with Plan Canvas.

Select “Plan Canvas for SMB”

Strategic versus tactical objectives

Generally speaking, if it is in direct support of how you are measuring business outcomes within a single fiscal year, it is a tactical objective that should be included in your business plan. If it is in direct support of a strategic goal or has a due-date that is beyond the 12-month financial cycle, it is a strategic objective and should be included in your strategic plan.

Some objectives are clearly strategic, some are clearly tactical, but often, it is a judgment call when deciding to label an objective as a long-term strategic objective, or a shorter-term tactical (business plan) objective.

Objectives, whether strategic or tactical, fall into one of 6 categories:

  1. Social responsibility
  2. Employee
  3. Customer/client
  4. Operations
  5. Sales/Marketing
  6. Financial

If you do nothing else, do this

There is so much more to strategic business planning and management, but, if you do nothing else, define your vision, mission, purpose, goals, strategic objectives and tactical objectives – whether just starting a business or running one that has been around for a long time. You will be miles ahead of the competition if you do.

The good news is you can do this and more with Plan Canvas – simply and effectively. Contact us for a demo or assistance.

You Need Project Portfolio Management – Just Not So Complicted

August 22nd, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Project Portfolio Management 0 thoughts on “You Need Project Portfolio Management – Just Not So Complicted”

An article at the Project Management Institute (PMI) entitled Project Portfolio Management Techniques starts out with a statement we often use at Plan Canvas as well:

“According to Gartner research, out of $1 to $2 trillion invested in IT deployments in North America annually 30% or $300 to $600 billion is wasted.”

That’s just in IT projects/deployments/strategic initiatives. The rate of failure is estimated to be about the same for all types of strategic initiatives, whether they involve IT or not.

It may be too much

The article goes on to define several key terms and components of Project Portfolio Management (PPM) as well as several diagrams to illustrate what PPM from an in-depth perspective looks like.

It’s all great stuff…if you are a larger company or are an expert in project, program, and portfolio management. If not, it can be a bit over-whelming, and a lot of it is overkill, especially for smaller businesses.

In other words, just like strategic business planning and execution methods and tools are usually too complex for small business, so is PPM. The end result? It too is ignored.

But it doesn’t have to be

There is still a need, even for a 1-person business or freelancer, to use good PPM methods – they just have to be stripped down and simplified so that they are affordable and realistic but still effective.

PPM Made Easy

Use a simplified approach to PPM

There are 2 types of project portfolios

There are both internal and external projects to include in your portfolio. Internal projects are “strategic initiatives.” These are things you need to do to better enable your business or meet certain long-term strategic goals. They are resource intensive, costing you time, money, or both. A simple example is the development of a website for your business.

External projects are things you deliver to your customer. They generate revenue. Examples include order fulfillment, a construction project, or perhaps you are building a new app for your client.

But they each have common traits

There are a handful of things you should keep in mind when defining a project and managing your portfolio, without complexity. Here is a simple list of things to do:

  1. Give the project a unique name.
  2. Identify the primary purpose of the project
  3. If it is an internal project, tie it directly to a defined strategic objective – if you can’t, don’t start the project.
  4. Prioritize the project as compared to others.
  5. Define the project target start and end dates.
  6. Identify who is going to “own” the project
  7. Identify any major milestones associated with the project
  8. Track progress – not started, started, complete.
  9. Track project health – Green = good, Yellow = caution, Red = bad.
  10. Be flexible with your portfolio:
    • Reprioritize as needed.
    • Don’t take on everything at once.
    • Delegate
    • Stay on top of it with regular reviews.

There is, of course, a lot more you can do in terms of project planning and PPM. The bigger the company, the bigger the project, the bigger the portfolio, the more you need much more involved PPM practices. But for small businesses, this list is generally all you need to start getting much better results.

Keep it simple

Don’t get too complex, and don’t throw out the notion of PPM simply because everything you’ve seen so far is just that – too complex.

Plan Canvas offers very simple PPM features for identifying, prioritizing, assigning and tracking your portfolio of projects – both internal and external.

Get started today or contact us for a demo.

There May Never be a Perfect Time to Take Time Off – So Just Do It

August 15th, 2018 Posted by Behavior, Blog Post 0 thoughts on “There May Never be a Perfect Time to Take Time Off – So Just Do It”

Even though we were in the heat of redesigning the Plan Canvas software, as well as working on our go-to-market strategy, every member of the small-but-mighty Plan Canvas team took time off over the last 4 weeks. Why would we do such a crazy thing just when things were so hectic?

Because things have been so hectic

The human body and brain are not infallible, perfect machines. They wear down and break down. They need to be refueled. From time-to-time, they need to be shut down for maintenance.

Even if what you do is something you just can’t wait to get up and do all over again tomorrow, you still need to take a break from time-to-time. Imagine you are at an amusement park with one particular roller coaster you simply love. As soon as one ride is over, you race right back into line to do it again.

How many times will you do that before you say, “That’s enough… for now.”

We need variety and we need a break

Every day you should seek a “time out” – to have a chance for your brain to shut down a little. Exercise. Take a nap. Read a book. Play with the dog. Sit on the back porch with your beverage of choice. Something, anything, that is not work. The work isn’t going anywhere. It will be there when you get back.

The same is true of vacation, whether it’s stay-at-home or you actually go somewhere – make it a vacation. Turn off the computer. Put the phone on silent, put it down, or put it away. Eat something you’ve never eaten before. Walk somewhere you’ve never walked before.

Shutting down is valuable

If it’s been awhile since you’ve done that, you have a perfect excuse coming up. Labor Day is just around the corner. Monday, September 3. Most of you will have that day off. If so, do something valuable with the long weekend.

Like shut down and relax a little.

Plan for Success – Focus on Execution

August 1st, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Strategy Execution 0 thoughts on “Plan for Success – Focus on Execution”

Success doesn’t just happen. You have to make it. But first, you have to define what it is.

A note from Jon Umstead:

Plan Canvas is great for startups but it was built with the operations/organization leader in mind – that was the perspective I was coming from when Business is ART was written, and the book subsequently became the impetus for the Plan Canvas software.

Prior to writing the book, my career revolved largely around project planning and management, business planning and management, strategic planning and management, and operational/organizational leadership. In almost every role, it was about planning for success and focusing on execution.

Not one or the other – both!

Plans are worthless. Planning is everything.

I learned very quickly what Dwight D. Eisenhower meant when he said, “Plans are worthless. Planning is everything.”

You can’t just get out there and start executing without a plan if you want to have any measure of success. There are exceptions. You might get lucky. Odds are you won’t.

You can’t devise a plan, set it aside, and start executing like the planning process never happened. That is only slightly better than not planning at all. It’s like buying 10 lottery tickets instead of 1. You increased your odds a little bit, but they are still really bad.

Likewise, you can’t execute to the plan so rigidly that you ignore reality. That is a recipe for disaster – perhaps worse than having no plan at all. Change happens constantly. You and your plans have to change right along with it.

Begin with the end in mind

Planning isn’t just a means to get a loan or attract investors. It’s a method of defining what success means to you and your new business. Beginning with the end in mind. From there, you walk backwards to develop a plan that will get you to your destination.

The plan itself is a best-case scenario given your present understanding of the circumstances and assessment of the risks involved.

“If all goes according to plan, victory is ours!”

But you know without a doubt you missed something, underestimated something, or that you will get blindsided by something that is outside of your control. It’s going to happen. Things won’t go according to plan.

But because you had a plan in the first place, you are aware of alternate routes. You can respond without panicking.

Act tactically – think strategically – get going

And, most importantly, you can act tactically while thinking strategically. You deal in the heat of the moment while keeping your eye on the prize – your definition of success.

Plan Canvas has an all new user interface and a completely redesigned dashboard to show you where you are in the planning process AND how you are executing.

For information and to get started, click on the statement that defines you best:

I am an operations / organization leader.

I am a small business owner.

I am a startup entrepreneur.

I am a freelancer.

I am a church or non-profit.

 

The Entrepreneurial Bug is Often a Childhood “Disease”

July 25th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Entrepreneur, Uncategorized 0 thoughts on “The Entrepreneurial Bug is Often a Childhood “Disease””

On the July 24 episode of the Business is ART podcast, the guest was Travis Pine, President/CEO of Lone Pine Holdings LLC and President/CEO of his new startup, Solstice Innovations, Inc. an insurance technology company that Travis is just now beginning to stand-up.

Early in the podcast, Travis noted that he caught the entrepreneurial bug at an early age, perhaps influenced by his father, who owned several restaurants at the time.

Our unscientific observation is that Travis represents the majority of entrepreneurs. They started a business  as a child or worked in a family business growing up. Many guests on the podcast have said that their parents even encouraged them to start businesses as children – like other parents might encourage their kids to play soccer or take art lessons.

(Listen to the podcast The Life of a Startup and What You Need to Know)

“Entrepreneur” isn’t limited to startup founders/owners

The word “entrepreneur” as used here is not meant to be exclusive to someone who starts her/his own business. Many operate in their professional lives with an entrepreneurial spirit without having any legal or financial ownership in the company or organization.

Some, podcast guests only half-jokingly referred to entrepreneurship as an incurable disease contracted. If most contract it at an early age, shouldn’t it be a priority for educational institutions, government, and employers to teach entrepreneurship at an early age.

In fact, many colleges and universities have already or are moving in that direction.

We need institutional change

See our white paper making a case for for a dramatic shift in institutional thinking – from how we plan to how we manage business plans and strategies.

The best entrepreneur programs according the U.S. News & World Report

According to U.S. News & World Report, the top ten undergraduate entrepreneur programs are at:

  1. Babson College, MA
  2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  3. Indiana University
  4. University of California
  5. University of Pennsylvania
  6. University of Southern California
  7. University of Texas
  8. University of North Carolina
  9. Saint Louis University
  10. University of Arizona

Many more schools, such as Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio and Ohio State University are either launching brand new programs or have just received large donations to enhance their programs.

Meanwhile, high schools are catching the entrepreneurial bug as well by offering programs specifically tailored to the aspiring entrepreneur, and some colleges are recommending specific classes that high schoolers take to better prepare them for collegiate entrepreneur programs.

Numerous private and non-profit programs have also joined the trend. Inc. has posted an article entitled These Nine Organizations are Turning Kids into Entrepreneurs using “startup thinking” as a way to “change how kids learn.”

The movement is real

The movement is real and the Plan Canvas team is proud to be a part of it. Please contact us to learn how we can help support your entrepreneur program.

From Entrepreneur to Student to Career to Entrepreneur

July 17th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Entrepreneur 0 thoughts on “From Entrepreneur to Student to Career to Entrepreneur”

Elise Mayville-Umstead

This week’s blog post is from guest-contributor, Elise Mayville-Umstead, founder of Umstead Farrier Service, Prince George, VA. Some entrepreneurs go into business because they have an idea they want to explore. Others, like Elise, go into it to explore a specific career or passion.

We have divided Elise’s guest-post into 6 key lessons.

A network of support is key

The simplest way to answer how I came to pursue my current skilled trade would be to state that it came to me as a natural progression of interest in horses.

I have always loved horses, from riding, to care, to learning about their behaviors, this passion of mine has been with me since I was in kindergarten drawing stick figure ponies. However, I would be remiss if I did not give credit to my mother for being an amazing role model and to my wonderful husband who has not only supported me every day but made going back to school possible. Both of these people have pushed me to continue to pursue my love of horses and helped me discover how to turn that passion into a career.

Find Your Passion

Click on the Button and Select Plan Canvas for Individual

Do you know what you want out of life and career?

Entrepreneurship often starts at a young age

At age 11, as a young entrepreneur, I began my own pet sitting service complete with an advertising brochure. By 12, I turned my pet sitting business into a multi-service enterprise that included lawn mowing and babysitting. By 16, I had a part time job at a local grocery store and at 18, graduated from high school with enough money to cover my total college books and living expenses.

I attended the University of New Hampshire my freshman year, majoring in Equine Sciences. After a year, I changed my focus, and major, to large animal livestock and transferred to Colorado State University where I graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Animal Science.

Entrepreneurs often excel in other jobs before starting a business

My first job after graduating was in the Swine Industry, where I managed a breed-to-wean hog operation in Nebraska for The Maschhoffs, one of the top three pork producers in the U.S. As manager, I was in charge of 21 barns, 4000 sows and piglets and a team of 7. After a few short months, I was able to increase production by 25% and maintained that status, or more, each quarter for the length of time I was there.

I accomplished this against many obstacles, two of which were that I was the only female on location in a male-dominated industry and I had no prior hog management experience. The hard work never bothered me. From vaccinations, castrations, weaning and much more, I took it all in stride.

From there, I moved to Fort Wainwright, Alaska with my husband, an officer in the U.S. Army. Unfortunately, the Fairbanks area did not have large animal options and after a few years out of the industry I found myself feeling the hunger pangs of needing to be involved in the animal industry once again.

Once it becomes a passion, it’s hard to ignore its call

I remember talking to my mom about future career choices and during the course of our discussion, she suggested combining my love of horses with my science education and farrier work came to mind. At the time, I laughed it off thinking at that point of time in my life, going back to school and making a drastic career change was not in the cards. That all changed when I attended a conference with a friend who is a professional farrier.

After attending the conference, I was hooked. I fell in love with the science; the puzzle to solve and treat the major foot issues a horse can have which affect not only the foot, but the entire body of the animal. The adage, ‘no hoof, no horse’ became my mantra. Once I decided that becoming a farrier was the next step, I began doing research of my own to discover what being a farrier truly meant.

I discovered that a farrier is a “forger, a welder, a toolmaker, and a shoemaker. He/she is an anatomist and a physiologist and treats the symptoms of lameness by developing a forward-thinking plan of action” (The Farrier Guide). I also (not surprisingly) discovered that it is a heavily male-dominated industry.

Know your market opportunity before you begin

I have been around horses most of my life but wanted to know if there were enough horses to be able to make a career for myself and was shocked to discover that according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, there are over 9.2 million pleasure and commercially used horses in the U.S. That’s a lot of feet that require trimming or shoeing every 4-6 weeks.

In May of 2017, I took the leap and applied to an intense 9-month farrier program at Meredith Manor International Equestrian Centre. Short term ‘shoeing’ schools and on-the-job apprenticeships for this career exist, but I needed and craved more and the theory, the experience, the certification, and the heavy forge work that this program offered, was exactly what I was looking for. I’ve had up to 140 animals available to work with, from companion animals to high performance competitors and not only pushed myself in the shop but pushed myself in the classroom. I started study groups and routinely instructed younger classmates, with 100 hours of volunteer time logged in support of my peers and an even greater understanding of my profession.

Understand the problem you are solving at the deepest levels

My efforts to gain a deeper understanding in my profession have yielded many results. I have played critical roles in correcting complex issues with lame or unsound horses, despite having only having 9 months training and experience. During my schooling, I also attended clinics to further my education and network with other farriers. I’ve learned to trim, balance, shoe horses, forge and more. More importantly, I have developed my skills around and under horses, learning more than I ever thought possible about their behaviors, how to care for them and how to educate my peers and clients.

I have finally discovered a career that I love and I am so thankful for my mother and husband for their continued support. Without them, I would not be where I am today.

Need a Coach / Consultant?

Contact us and tell us what you need? Maybe we can help.

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