Posts in Inspiration

Share the Good Things You Do – Just Don’t Cheapen It

September 11th, 2018 Posted by Behavior, Blog Post, Inspiration 0 thoughts on “Share the Good Things You Do – Just Don’t Cheapen It”

At work or in your business, how do you share the good things you do outside of it, that benefit others, without making it sound like a cheap marketing ploy?

On a recent episode of the Business is ART podcast at the TrueChat Network, guest Joseph Lewin discussed the importance of having a business identity. He also discussed how it differs from, but relates to, brand identity.

(listen to the podcast in its entirety by clicking here)

Support your story by defining social responsibility goals and objectives.

Don’t have a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) plan for your business? You can use Plan Canvas to identify strategic CRM goals and and objectives. We help you by providing the category and a few examples to include in your Strategic and Business Plans. See previous blog post entitled “The Difference Between Goals, Strategic Objectives and Tactical Objectives.”

Share Without Making It About Yourself

Early in the show, the discussion turned to telling your personal story as part of your business identity, if not your brand identity, without cheapening it or making it painfully obvious that even though you do good things for others, you might be doing them for the wrong reasons.

In other words, how do you share the fact that you help others without making it about self-promotion? Here are a few ideas:

  1. Create a separate web page specifically designed to tell your story-  or to highlight your corporate social responsibility (CSR) program.
  2. Spend a minimum amount of time discussing why the cause is important to you.
  3. Spend more time discussing why it is important to the benefactor(s) of your good works.
  4. Spend even more time discussing why it is important to anyone listening, reading, watching, etc.
  5. Avoid or minimize use of the words “I” and “me” – use words like “we” and “you” more frequently.
  6. Keep the selfies to a minimum – focus on others. If you find you or your image is the star of the show, you missed the boat. An exception may be if you are making a personal appeal for others to support the same good works or cause, but even then, make it about others, not yourself.

Above all…BE SINCERE

It’s easy to smell a rat. Helping others is not about your ego. Be sincere about what you are doing. Don’t do it to showboat. You can show your customers how awesome you are by providing them with great products and services.

That said, the good works that you do are part of what makes you the person that you are, or the business that you represent.

Tell the story. Just be mindful of the focus.

What’s Holding You Back?

May 2nd, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Inspiration 0 thoughts on “What’s Holding You Back?”

Chapter Two of the book Business is ART is entitled “Refusing to be Constrained by the Shackles of Choreography,” which is an original way of saying, “be original.”

Just because something has been done the same way forever doesn’t mean it’s the best or only way to do it. Innovation and progress are dependent on challenging the norm.

But at its core, Chapter Two is asking one basic, impactful question. What is holding you back?

In a blog post from 1 year ago, almost to the day, we highlighted Laura Harting’s response to that question. Laura was a student at Urbana University at the time.

(see What is that supposed to mean? Nothing is holding me back. 4/27/2017)

At first, Laura found the question to almost be offensive. Nothing was holding her back. Then she thought on it more deeply and realized she actually did have some shackles of her own. Subsequently, she decided to get rid of them, as discussed in the original post.

Laura recently shared an update, and it has been an amazing year for her since shedding those shackles.

Following is an excerpt from her update:

I have always hated and feared change, even as a small child. Without the strategic management class and your book, I would have never been able to embrace change with open arms. 

In July [2017], I accepted a full time job (my first big change of pace) with a staffing agency in Cincinnati as a recruiter. Although I knew this was not my dream job, it was a start in what I thought was my HR passion.  

Just a few weeks into it, an amazing opportunity presented itself and I went out on a limb. I applied for a Graduate Assistantship position at Wittenberg University to pursue a Masters of Art in Athletic Coaching.

Being a college athlete, and coaching summer swim on the side, always made me wonder if there was something more out there in the coaching world. I applied for the position and was offered it not even a week later. I was weary because, as I’ve mentioned before, change has not always been my favorite.

In the back of my mind though, I thought of the book and that looming question, “What is holding you back?”  

I knew that I could not turn down this opportunity and took a leap of faith. I could not be happier that I embraced the new change in my life and went for what seemed somewhat unrealistic at the time. I am thriving and have succeeded as an assistant swim coach with the Men’s and Women’s swim team here at Wittenberg, along with being a student again.

I have even learned that my business degree has been an asset to my success, as running a team is a lot like running a business. 

I wanted to reach out to you and thank you. Like I stated above, if I had not learned to embrace change and realize that I in fact did have things holding me back, I would have never taken this leap of faith that has led me where I am today. Thank you for playing a part in my journey!

Best Wishes,

Laura Harting, Graduate Assistant Coach

Wittenberg University Swimming & Diving

Focusing on the Success of Others

Our purpose is to focus on the success of others. With the book Business is ART as the precursor to the Plan Canvas software, we feel that at least in this one case we got it right. And now Laura is doing the same – focusing on the success of many others. Think of the possibilities if each of us could positively impact just one life. That’s all it takes to exponentially make a difference in the world.

We are dedicating the month of May to the topic “What’s holding you back?” and would love to hear and share your stories as well. Please contact us to do so.

Meanwhile, continued best wished to Laura on her journey. We can’t wait to see where it leads.

36,900,000 Results When Searching for “How to Stay Inspired”

February 6th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Inspiration, Uncategorized, Vision 2 thoughts on “36,900,000 Results When Searching for “How to Stay Inspired””

If you enter “how to stay inspired” into your search engine, it will net about 36,900,000 results.

You’d think with so many people, organizations and articles out there to help us get or stay inspired, we’d find it much easier to do so. But the hard truth about inspiration is that while finding it is comparatively easy, keeping it is relatively difficult.

We gleefully make resolutions and promises to ourselves, saying things like, “This year, I am REALLY going to get in shape!”

We go to seminars with leading gurus, buy their books and courses, then run out with our arms raised, declaring, “I’m gonna do it!”

We watch TED videos, Shark Tank, and SuperSoul Sunday and exclaim, “I’m going to make a difference!

Aaaaannnnnndddd thennnnnnnn….we don’t

Why is it so hard to remain inspired (and motivated)?

An article at Care2 entitled 5 Reasons Why Motivation is Difficult to Sustain provides an interesting list of reasons it is hard to stay motivated. Even though inspiration and motivation are two different things, they are related, so we will list the 5 here as follows:

  1. No plan
  2. Distractions
  3. Drawbacks
  4. Negative motivation
  5. Extrinsic motivation (depend on outside world to reap rewards on you)

But here is what we think is the real reason it is hard to remain inspired

As discussed in a previous post, motivation is external and compels you to do something. Inspiration is internal – something you feel.

(see Where Do You Find Inspiration?).

The real reason that inspiration can be fleeting is because it’s a feeling – and feelings are naturally fleeting. Generally speaking, feelings can hit us with great intensity. Later the intensity fades – perhaps entirely, perhaps not, but it usually fades.

Maybe it isn’t important to remain inspired

If feelings are naturally fleeting, perhaps trying hard to hold on to inspiration is futile.

Perhaps, rather than spending hundreds and thousands of dollars and hours on the inspirational products of the inspirational gurus, we spend our resources REMEMBERING what inspired us, as opposed to PRESERVING the feeling.

It isn’t as difficult as you might think

When you feel inspired, remember, it is a feeling and it will fade. Before it has faded too deeply, write it down. Capture things like:

  • What were you inspired to do?
  • How did that feel?
  • What were you doing when it hit you?
  • Who were you with?
  • What were you thinking or thinking of?
  • What were some other circumstances surrounding you at the time?

Now use that to write a purpose statement. This isn’t WHAT you are going to do. This is WHY you are going to do it.

In business, it is foundational to have a Vision Statement, a Mission Statement, and a Purpose Statement. Vision is how you see things in the future, preferably as a result of what you do. Mission is in fact what you do. But purpose is why you do it.

The same types of statements can be useful in your personal life.

Once you have a vision, mission and purpose statement, put them in reverse order (purpose, mission, and vision). This becomes your elevator pitch for whatever you are doing – and it always starts with your purpose, which is founded in your inspiration.

Say it often. Start your day with it. Start your presentations with it. Start your meetings with it.

Don’t cheapen it or make it a rote statement, but use it often enough to remind yourself and others of what you felt in that moment of inspiration, even though the intensity of the feeling itself may have faded.

This will in turn help keep you motivated, even if no longer inspired.

Where Do You Find Inspiration?

January 30th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Inspiration, Uncategorized 1 thought on “Where Do You Find Inspiration?”

Where Do You Find Inspiration?

Before answering that question, it’s important to note that there is a difference between inspiration and motivation. Motivation is external and compels you to do something. Inspiration is internal – something you feel.

As an example, three deaths by suicide served as the motivation behind writing the book, Business is ART and development of Plan Canvas, the strategy execution management (SEM) software that is based on the book.

Motivation isn’t inspiration

Those deaths were external events that triggered a desire to help others. It is a horrible means of motivation, but, sometimes, tragedy, or hitting rock bottom, is needed to motivate us to do something positive.

But the inspiration for creating these particular tools came from somewhere else. The book was literally conjured in a dream. The software was first envisioned as the table of contents for the book was being written, particularly when business as ART was laid out as a 12-step process (defined processes lend themselves well to being systematized).

So a more appropriate question might be….

HOW do you find inspiration?

An article at Inc. provides 25 simple ways to find inspiration. We really like this list. In fact, many of these same notions are included in Business is ART.

Find inspiration

Watch this demo to see how Plan Canvas can help you find inspiration.

Our favorite 5 from the article are listed here, along with a brief explanation of how you can actually follow them in Plan Canvas:

  1. Write it down – Plan Canvas encourages you to record everything that is important about your business in the tool.
  2. Evaluate your goals – You then produce a Progress Report to review with others to track how you are doing with all of those critically important items.
  3. Simplify – Plan Canvas is built on this key principle. Planning your business and executing to that plan should be simple, not over-bearing.
  4. Question all assumptions – Within Plan Canvas, you document all major assumptions, the risk associated with the assumption, the impact if the risk occurs, the likelihood it will occur, and, importantly, how you will mitigate against that risk.
  5. Focus on yourself – Plan Canvas includes a Personal Plan for anyone to focus on themselves, regardless of whether they are an entrepreneur, business owner, organizational leader or not.

Everyone is different

Some people find inspiration while in hurry up mode. Others need quiet, uninterrupted time. Whatever the case may be for you, the most important thing is to have an open mind. Inspiration often comes in the most unexpected ways – but we have to be open to being inspired for it to happen.

Great Ideas for 2018 – A Resolution Revolution

December 19th, 2017 Posted by Behavior, Blog Post, Business Plan, Entrepreneur, Goal, Inspiration, Strategic Planning 0 thoughts on “Great Ideas for 2018 – A Resolution Revolution”

Let’s make 2018 the year of the resolution revolution. No more empty promises that fizzle out within the first 2 to 6 weeks. Let’s get serious this time.

An article at The Balance entitled Top New Year’s Resolutions for Business Success has some easy, actionable ideas that we really like a lot, particularly:

  • Make business planning a weekly event
  • Set realistic goals
  • Join a new business organization or networking group
  • Give something back to your community

Of course we like them because they are essentially some of the basic premises on which Plan Canvas is built. Let’s take a look at them a little more closely.

Resolution 1 – Business planning as a weekly event

Honestly, as much as we love business planning, doing it weekly may be a bit of an over-reach. But there are some things relative to the business plan that really should be done weekly. Namely:

  • Review progress against both the strategic and the business plan on a weekly basis. Note, some objectives may only require monthly or quarterly progress checks.
  • Review progress against assigned action items, internal initiatives, and client projects.

Whatever you do, do not write a business plan that is never referred to, tracked against, or updated. Otherwise, you are missing out on the primary benefits of strategically managing a plan – greater results.

Resolution 2 – Set realistic goals

Again, if we are being completely honest, we are OK with setting goals that might seem a little “out there.” Goals should be big, lofty things. Add a dose of reality but think and dream big when setting goals.

Now objectives are another story. Objectives let you know how you are progressing toward goals. One objective may support many goals and one goal is likely to be supported by many objectives. By nature, objectives should be realistic.

In fact that is one of 5 characteristics of a well defined SMART objective:

  • S – Specific
  • M – Measurable
  • A – Achievable
  • R – Realistic
  • T – Time-bound

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Resolution 3 – Join a new business organization or networking group

There are two primary types of groups we highly encourage you to join. One is a business networking group. The other is a peer mastermind group.

Networking groups are focused on growing your business through referrals. In these types of groups you get to know others on a more personal level, building relationships to the point that you mutually, genuinely refer each others’ business, products or services to others – key because it is also your reputation on the line when you refer others to people in your own network.

Peer mastermind groups, are not networking groups at all. They are work groups designed to help members resolve business and personal issues that affect the business. A well run mastermind group “rolls up the sleeves and gets to work.” It is not about socializing over cocktails and business referrals.

Resolution 4 – Give something back to your community

We saved the best for last. Giving back through your business is called “Corporate Social Responsibility” or CSR. Formally defining a CSR program for your business, no matter what size, actually increases your odds of success.

We call it setting value-based goals as opposed to profit-driven goals. When you focus CSR goals, then employee goals, then customer goals, your profit goals will naturally follow and you will feel much more fulfilled.

Resolution 5 – Be intentional in 2018

The year 2018. Here it comes. What will you do? Will you wait and see what happens, or will you intentionally lay out a plan and go after it?

A Damn Fine Design Studio

November 15th, 2017 Posted by Blog Post, Business is ART, Business Plan, Inspiration, Subscriber of the Month 0 thoughts on “A Damn Fine Design Studio”

Our featured subscriber of the month is FRW Studios and its founders/owners Julie and Lance White.

As their tagline states, FRW is “a damn fine design studio” based out of Dana Point, CA. FRW offers efficient, creative, lasting solutions for all of one’s marketing and advertising needs. Their primary customer is marketing departments that want to save costs on extra employees.

Julie and Lance have years of experience in the services that FRW provides, but FRW is itself a start-up, less than a year old. And although Plan Canvas is less than 3 months old, Lance is not new to the processes and templates of the Plan Canvas software.

Before launching FRW Studios with his wife, Julie, Lance managed an automobile dealership. When the automaker demanded a business plan or risk losing the dealership, Lance employed the practices defined in Business is ART, the book by Plan Canvas founder Jon Umstead upon which the software is built.

The automaker accepted the resulting plan, and within the first month of executing to it, Lance’s team met its monthly targets for the first time in over a year.

“When he told me that,” reflected Jon, “I said it was merely a coincidence. You don’t typically see results that fast.”

But Lance disagreed, saying it was absolutely no coincidence at all. He said the difference was that, with the plan, he and his team were better focused on what they had to achieve.

Want to try Plan Canvas but think you may need the assistance of a consultant?

We have you covered.

Sometimes you just need a little help or a little push to get started. We have an option for a minimal engagement with a consultant to help you do just that.

Learn More…

And that’s the real value of a plan

Lance could have simply developed a plan to satisfy the automaker, then throw the plan away, as is often the case – use the plan to satisfy the wants/needs of some third-party, for whatever purpose, then discard it. But he gained even more value out of it by managing the plan well after the automaker was satisfied with the sheer existence of one.

Having had that positive experience, when the time came to define their new business, FRW Studios, Lance and Julie became early adopters of Plan Canvas, first as beta test users, and now as users of the production software.

“Right away we were able to see what was going to be the most important aspects of our design firm”

According to Lance, “Right away we were able to see what was going to be the most important aspects of our design firm in order to succeed. As a living document, our business plan has changed, but we’re focusing on the right aspects of our business.“

Julie and Lance feel that a major difference between how things are now, using the tool, versus how they would have been had they not used it, is in measuring and seeing success.

“It feels so good to be farther along than the original goals in our mind, plus we were able to see certain positions we planned to hire weren’t needed quite yet.”

These are real, measurable outcomes.

The future is bright

In three years, Julie and Lance see FRW Studios as one of Orange County California’s highest-rated design firms, with their current clients not just still with them, but true advocates for FRW.

Julie and Lance are passionate about FRW Studios. It is their startup baby – they birthed together- and it is named after their children, Frances and Reagan White (FRW).

Lance says, “My wife and I started our firm for their future. And when you love your work like we do, it passes off to your personal life.”

We hope Plan Canvas is along for every step of the ride and are proud to be associated with Julie, Lance and FRW Studios – a damn fine design studio and a damn fine couple of entrepreneurs.

Please click here for a list of some of the features and a demo of Plan Canvas.

Congratulations Raffa P.C.

September 18th, 2017 Posted by Behavior, Blog Post, Inspiration 0 thoughts on “Congratulations Raffa P.C.”

We decided the topic of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) was a good one on which to blog this week. Last week, we shared on Twitter and LinkedIn an article by Roger Wolens of The Green Organisation entitled How Millennials Are Reshaping What’s Important In Corporate Culture, so the topic was fresh on our mind.

The article emphasizes the importance of CSR, stating, “70 percent of millennials are willing to spend more with brands that support causes they care about.”

Looking for additional information to reference in this week’s post, we did one quick online search, which took us straight to CSRWire’s September 13, 2017 post entitled Raffa, PC, Honored As the Most Improved Impact Business, Leading the Race to the Top of Companies Creating Positive Change.

We needed search no further

That find concluded our search because Plan Canvas has an indirect tie to Raffa Social Corporate Advisors by way of Raffa team member Rich Tafel.

Rich was a major influencer on Plan Canvas founder, Jon Umstead, having served as Jon’s business coach and advisor for a number of years. Rich actually introduced the term “CSR” to Jon years ago before it was part of the common business vernacular. But the ties don’t end there.

In Business is ART, the book that inspired the development of Plan Canvas, Jon refers to his coach and the benefits of having one – that was Rich, who would go on to provide an inside cover review for the book when it was ready for publication.

Value-Based vs. Profit-Driven Goals

More importantly, Rich inspired 2 components of Plan Canvas of which we are very proud.

One is an emphasis on social responsibility within the tool’s planning and management functions. As an example, one of 4 long-term strategic goal categories is “Social Responsibility”. It is also 1 of 6 categories of Key Performance Indicators (KPI) used for defining long or short-term objectives.

With social responsibility as a major category of goals and KPIs, we emphasize that businesses, no matter how large or small, should start by setting value-based as opposed to profit-driven goals and objectives.

Personal Planning is as Important as Business Planning

But it doesn’t end there. Rich also introduced a personal planning process to Jon that, with Rich’s permission, was slightly modified and included in both the book and the software. The personal plan allows the leader or entrepreneur to step away from the business for a moment to focus on him or herself, the individual – which is critical to success and fulfillment.

Congratulations to the Raffa Team

The CSRWire post begins by saying, “Today, Raffa, P.C. was recognized as a top performer in the B Corp community earning a place on the 2017 Best for the World lists. Named 2017 Best for Governance by scoring in the top 10 percent of all B Corps and also 2017 Best for the World: Changemaker for making the most positive improvement on their overall impact based on the B Impact Assessment an independent, comprehensive assessment administered by the nonprofit B Lab, Raffa continues to lead in the movement of people using business as a force for good.”

Rich’s influence can be seen throughout Business is ART and Plan Canvas. We are absolutely thrilled for him, Raffa, P.C. CEO Tom Raffa, and the entire Raffa team for this recognition.

Congratulations!

Top 3 Ways to Stop Clicking On the Top 3 Ways to do Something Headlines

July 2nd, 2017 Posted by Blog Post, Inspiration 0 thoughts on “Top 3 Ways to Stop Clicking On the Top 3 Ways to do Something Headlines”

top 3You know you’ve done it. You do it all the time. We all do it. As Mel Brooks’ character King Louis XVI says in the classic movie History of the World Part I, “I just did it and I’m ready to do it again, don’t tell me you don’t do it!”

What is “it”? Clicking on those damned headlines that say Top 3 Ways, Top 3 Secrets, Top 3 Reasons, etc., etc. etc. Don’t like the number 3? Look for the same headlines with the numbers 5, 9 or 11…maybe even go as high as 50 or 100 if you are feeling really crazy.

3 shall be the number thou shalt count, and the number of the counting shall be 3

Headlines like that are used because, reportedly, science says we are more likely to click on them than headlines like, “Here’s something you should consider,” or “Hey, you, I’d like to share some real world experience with you.”

Who are these people?

Who is writing these things and what makes them such an expert on the 3 things? How do they know they are the top 3 things? How do they know the 3 things aren’t just a few of many things, none really being any better or more on top than the other, un-named things?

Sometimes the author is legitimate, using real research or experience to back up their claims. Sometimes it’s an intern that has no real experience and is just throwing crap out there because it makes for great traffic, might be a good read, but doesn’t really provide you with any new information.

Are those 3 things really informative?

Sometimes those top 3 things are no more informative than this – Top 3 Ways to Not Die:

  1. Keep breathing
  2. Don’t let your heart stop beating
  3. Become immortal

Top 3 ways to make it stop

So how can you stop falling for those “Top 3 Ways” headlines? Here are the top 3 ways:

  1. Check who authored the article, blog etc. Look at their experience and accomplishments. Then decide if you want to read the stuff they write or not.
  2. Look at the number of comments and reviews of the piece.
  3. Look at the profiles of people that follow the author.

If any of it smells a little funny, it’s probably because it’s rotten.

And if all else fails, click on it anyway, read it, and discard it immediately. That might be faster.

In the Pursuit of Harmony

June 14th, 2017 Posted by Blog Post, Entrepreneur, Inspiration, Relationships 0 thoughts on “In the Pursuit of Harmony”

tom rubensA recent guest on the Business is ART podcast at the TrueChat Network was coach and best selling author Tom Rubens. We focused on Tom’s book Lifeness: Harmonize an Entrepreneurial Life, but there are several points made during the show that are summarized here.

One of the things Tom likes to tell people is that he has managed to have a professional career without holding a job. In other words, he is a lifelong, successful entrepreneur. He understands what many early stage entrepreneurs discover very quickly – that the entrepreneurial life can become all-consuming.

Stop saying and looking for “work/life balance”

Neither Tom nor I like the term “work/life balance” but for different reasons. While I prefer to talk in terms of “work/life alignment”, Tom introduces the notion of harmony. When your entrepreneurial life becomes all-consuming, there is no harmony. In all likelihood, there is discord between your entrepreneurial life, your personal life, your relationships (including professional, personal and casual), etc.

Just as you might physically cringe when you hear dissonance or music that is out of tune, when your life is in a state of discord, your business, you and everyone around you suffer.

How do you achieve harmony?

Tom sums it up by saying that it is all about achieving a life in which business and personal goals merge harmoniously. His advice is pretty simple. Following through is the challenge – which is why he provides a personal workbook along with Lifeness to help you on your journey.

He says that the key to seeking harmony is to first empathize with others. Listen to them. Look for similarities and appreciate the differences because they can be complementary, not conflicting, which, in turn, creates opportunity.

Tom also strongly advises to always assume people are doing their best. If you can do that, you can take the negative emotion out of things and learn to better appreciate the efforts of others.

Listen to the show in its entirety

The episode featuring Tom Rubens is simply entitled “Lifeness” (May 23, 2017). You can listen to it on iTunes, through the TrueChat app, or through the TrueChat website.

Check out all of the Business is ART podcast episodes on the Business is ART page of the TrueChat website

What is that supposed to mean? Nothing is holding me back!

April 27th, 2017 Posted by Blog Post, Business is ART, Inspiration 4 thoughts on “What is that supposed to mean? Nothing is holding me back!”
critique

Laura Harting – Urbana University

As discussed in a previous blog, I had the great honor of having my book used in a 300-level course on strategic management and leadership at Urbana University this semester. Last week I met with the students from the class to listen to their feedback on the book.

The following critique and testimonial was written by one of the students, Marketing and Management major Laura Harting, who gave her permission to post it in its entirety here.

Thank you very much, Laura and here’s is to a great future!

Laura’s Review

Generally, I really enjoyed using the Business is ART book.  Jon’s advice and instructions in the book felt genuine and straight from the heart. He really had a way of engaging his readers and being relatable.

The end of chapter questions were among my favorite parts. They helped me bring the things I read full circle and relate them to my own life and my future plans, along with previous experiences.

Before I began reading Business is ART, I will say I was skeptical. But what I found within the book was not what I was expecting. Not only was the book insightful, but it really brought things in my own life to my attention.

For example, in Chapter 1, the end of chapter questions talked about our vision and how we define success. This made me think about what I want in my future and the steps I need to take to get there. Thinking about my vision for my life was an eye opener. It made me realize that I had not really done any prior planning for post-graduation.

In Chapter 2, we were asked about the things that we feel are holding us back. At first I kind of brushed this question off, thinking, “What is that supposed to mean? Nothing is holding me back.”

But this is really not the case. In fact there are a lot of things that have been holding me back – a lot of that being fear of the future. I realized that my hesitation to move far away from the place I have known and loved my whole life was holding me back from some amazing career opportunities.

At the beginning of this course, my plan for graduation was to apply for jobs close to home. Now, less than a month from graduation, I have had phone interviews for out-of-state jobs and even traveled to Nashville for interviews in order to explore career opportunities.

Without Business is ART, I feel I would not have realized that my fear of the unknown was holding me back from amazing career opportunities. I realized that being tied down to next to nothing was not limiting me to stay in Ohio and close to my family. Business is ART somehow managed to get me to see things about myself that I was not seeing before opening the book.

Overall, Business is ART, and the end of chapter questions were very useful to me as a soon-to-be college graduate.

An apology

To Laura’s friends and family that may not want her to relocate…uhhhh…I’m sorry.

A note to all

Stay in touch by joining my email list and signing up for my monthly newsletter. I don’t spam and try very hard to provide you with enjoyable and informative content.

Plan Canvas is a community and a powerful software for improving your odds of business success and personal fulfillment.

© SeaSeven LLC 2017.
Developed with FRW Studios.