Posts in Vision

Why Your Vision Statement Matters

March 21st, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Strategy, Uncategorized, Vision 0 thoughts on “Why Your Vision Statement Matters”

A March 21, 2017 article at Entrepreneur entitled “How To Engage Employees Through Your Company Vision Statement” by Andre Lavoie sites a study that found “60% of employees didn’t know their company’s vision.”

Yet, an understanding of and appreciation for the Vision and Strategies is an integral part to both improving employee engagement (approximately 30%) and the successful implementation of Strategic Initiatives (also about 30%).

So it stands to reason that we should be doing a better job of defining and communicating Vision.

An excerpt from an up-coming white paper

The following is an excerpt from a white paper that we are publishing in early April on how to improve strategy execution and why it’s critical to business survival.

Strategy Execution Improvement

Critical Success Factors to Surviving and Thriving

Order a pre-release copy of our upcoming white paper on how to improve strategy execution.

Vision is how you see things in the ideal future. The Mission is often mistaken for or sometimes blended into the Vision Statement, but they are two separate things. While the Vision is how you see things, the Mission is what you do.

Amazon’s is as an example of a well-written, combined, Vision and Mission Statement, as follows:

“Our vision is to be Earth’s most customer-centric company; to build a place where people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online.”

The Vision is to be Earth’s most customer-centric company. The Mission is to build a place people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online.

Note that in neither the Vision nor the Mission Statement does Amazon mention how they will get there, nor what that “place” looks like. Amazon can change its business model, how it serves customers, and enabling technology at will – without changing the Vision and Mission.

Think of it as remodeling the house without replacing the foundation.

Compare that to Walmart’s Vision Statement

Compare that to Walmart’s Vision Statement, “To be the best retailer in the hearts and minds of consumers and employees,” and their Mission Statement, “Saving people money so they can live better.”

These statements aren’t inherently wrong, but they do generate perceptions that are not necessarily positive, such as:

  • Now a classic retailer, always a classic retailer
  • It might be the best, but I still don’t like it
  • I can only live better by saving money – and purchasing lower quality items

“A Walmart on every corner” is increasingly a losing proposition that may not be dying, but is not well positioned to thrive against an Amazon.

Perhaps some of the reason for that is rooted in their Vision and Mission statements.

36,900,000 Results When Searching for “How to Stay Inspired”

February 6th, 2018 Posted by Blog Post, Inspiration, Uncategorized, Vision 2 thoughts on “36,900,000 Results When Searching for “How to Stay Inspired””

If you enter “how to stay inspired” into your search engine, it will net about 36,900,000 results.

You’d think with so many people, organizations and articles out there to help us get or stay inspired, we’d find it much easier to do so. But the hard truth about inspiration is that while finding it is comparatively easy, keeping it is relatively difficult.

We gleefully make resolutions and promises to ourselves, saying things like, “This year, I am REALLY going to get in shape!”

We go to seminars with leading gurus, buy their books and courses, then run out with our arms raised, declaring, “I’m gonna do it!”

We watch TED videos, Shark Tank, and SuperSoul Sunday and exclaim, “I’m going to make a difference!

Aaaaannnnnndddd thennnnnnnn….we don’t

Why is it so hard to remain inspired (and motivated)?

An article at Care2 entitled 5 Reasons Why Motivation is Difficult to Sustain provides an interesting list of reasons it is hard to stay motivated. Even though inspiration and motivation are two different things, they are related, so we will list the 5 here as follows:

  1. No plan
  2. Distractions
  3. Drawbacks
  4. Negative motivation
  5. Extrinsic motivation (depend on outside world to reap rewards on you)

But here is what we think is the real reason it is hard to remain inspired

As discussed in a previous post, motivation is external and compels you to do something. Inspiration is internal – something you feel.

(see Where Do You Find Inspiration?).

The real reason that inspiration can be fleeting is because it’s a feeling – and feelings are naturally fleeting. Generally speaking, feelings can hit us with great intensity. Later the intensity fades – perhaps entirely, perhaps not, but it usually fades.

Maybe it isn’t important to remain inspired

If feelings are naturally fleeting, perhaps trying hard to hold on to inspiration is futile.

Perhaps, rather than spending hundreds and thousands of dollars and hours on the inspirational products of the inspirational gurus, we spend our resources REMEMBERING what inspired us, as opposed to PRESERVING the feeling.

It isn’t as difficult as you might think

When you feel inspired, remember, it is a feeling and it will fade. Before it has faded too deeply, write it down. Capture things like:

  • What were you inspired to do?
  • How did that feel?
  • What were you doing when it hit you?
  • Who were you with?
  • What were you thinking or thinking of?
  • What were some other circumstances surrounding you at the time?

Now use that to write a purpose statement. This isn’t WHAT you are going to do. This is WHY you are going to do it.

In business, it is foundational to have a Vision Statement, a Mission Statement, and a Purpose Statement. Vision is how you see things in the future, preferably as a result of what you do. Mission is in fact what you do. But purpose is why you do it.

The same types of statements can be useful in your personal life.

Once you have a vision, mission and purpose statement, put them in reverse order (purpose, mission, and vision). This becomes your elevator pitch for whatever you are doing – and it always starts with your purpose, which is founded in your inspiration.

Say it often. Start your day with it. Start your presentations with it. Start your meetings with it.

Don’t cheapen it or make it a rote statement, but use it often enough to remind yourself and others of what you felt in that moment of inspiration, even though the intensity of the feeling itself may have faded.

This will in turn help keep you motivated, even if no longer inspired.

What is SEM – Strategic Execution Management?

December 12th, 2017 Posted by Blog Post, Business is ART, Business Plan, Objective, Strategic Planning, Strategy, Vision 1 thought on “What is SEM – Strategic Execution Management?”

As we prepared to launch Plan Canvas, a bootstrapped passion project led by subject matter and technical experts, none of who had a clue about marketing and public relations, we began thinking about how to truly position ourselves in the market.

Plan Canvas’ origins are in the book Business is ART (Articulate, Revise, Track), which makes it clear that there is a distinction between strategic planning and strategic management.

See related post 2 Main Phases of Business – Planning it and Running it.

How to differentiate

So, from the start, Plan Canvas has never been about “develop a one-and-done business plan” even though the prevailing sentiment erroneously assumes that is exactly all a business plan is – one-and-done. Instead, Plan Canvas has always been about executing to and revising the plan as you move along. That is where the real benefit of planning is realized.

So rather than being a simpler business planning tool in a saturated market, we knew we had to position ourselves differently because we are genuinely different.

As an unknown startup with limited means to reach large numbers of potential customers, we were excited (and somewhat shocked) to accept an invitation to meet with representatives from technology research firm Gartner, who had come across Plan Canvas through our humble and limited content marketing efforts.

Should Gartner decide at some point to review Plan Canvas in greater detail, it would be a tremendous honor because Gartner is a major influencer.

A Eureka Moment

In the meantime, they provided us with the perfect answer to our question – how do we position ourselves in the market?

The answer is that Plan Canvas fits into an emerging market of Strategic Execution Management, or SEM, tools. At a very high level you can think of SEM as the bringing together of business/strategic planning and project portfolio management (PPM) – with a focus on communication and the achievement of measurable results.

From Gartner’s perspective, SEM tools support the process of ART-ful strategy execution in several ways, including, but not limited to:

  • Visualizing the organization’s strategies, goals, missions, objectives, plans, projects, etc – Articulate
  • Prioritizing any continuing, upcoming and in-flight investments relative to strategies – Articulate, Revise
  • Continuous planning and project investments – Articulate, Revise
  • Capturing actual metrics – Track

Plan Canvas does this and more, including the additional elements of Gartner’s definition of SEM.

We’re getting there

And so we carry on with our journey to put Plan Canvas in the hands of those who stand to benefit from its use – but now with a renewed sense of who we truly are.

Step 1: Build and validate the product – CHECK!

Step 2: Determine the market position – CHECK!

Step 3: Determine appropriate market messaging and introductions to influencers – WORKING ON IT!

4 Tools to Make Your Business a Success

February 25th, 2016 Posted by Behavior, CEO, Entrepreneur, Goal, Leadership, Owner, Social Media, Strategy, Vision 0 thoughts on “4 Tools to Make Your Business a Success”

Business is ARTToo many young business leaders charge headstrong into the foray of their industry only to realize that they bit off more than they can chew. When it comes to starting a business and making it a success, you have to be prepared to take on anything that the business world will throw at you.

And that can often be a lot.

Between the competition, the costs and the unexpected bumps you are going to hit along the way, getting your company off the ground is never a straight shot from point A to point B. Instead, it is a winding road that will lead you all over the place. There will be days when you surge forward, days when you are left at a standstill and days that set you back more than you’d like to admit.

Nevertheless, you need to keep pushing forward with your business vision.

Tools that Build Success

Sounds easy, right? You’ve got your vision, you’ve got your business plan and you’ve even got a team in place to help you build it.

For some, this is all that is necessary. They have a lot of luck and their business just seems to take flight out of nowhere But these lucky first-timers are few and far between. Most people have to work very hard at building their business, and they often need a lot of help along the way.

You need more than a business plan to reach your definition of success. You also need tools to help you with everything from planning to your day-to-day operations. Even if you know exactly where you are going, you still need a means by which to get there.

Free Resources to Help You Out

There are quite a few free business tools out there that can help your business out. Some of the best that you can use are:

  • Google Apps: It’s like having Microsoft Word and Excel for free on your work computer. Plus, it is easy to share documents with your co-workers and clients.
  • Dropbox: A must have for businesses that need free cloud storage space. You can get 2GB of space for free, with paid plans upping your storage capacity.
  • LinkedIn: If you want your business to be taken seriously, you have to have a customer-facing image that is impressive and professional.
  • A Strategic Plan: What is your company’s vision and goals? It is essential for business owners to know where they want to go, but it is even more important to know how to get there. We have a free “One Page Strategic Plan” in our “Freebies” section that you can download to help get you there.

Learn as Much as You Can

The Business is ART book talks about not only having a plan, but always being prepared to revise that plan as the circumstances around you change. To do this, you have to learn all that goes into business planning, execution and more. The book, and our software subscription that is set to release soon, are two great tools that you can use to help you achieve success.

How to Tell it’s Time to Quit Your Job and Start Your Own Company

February 18th, 2016 Posted by Business is ART, Business Plan, Entrepreneur, Inspiration, Leadership, Vision 0 thoughts on “How to Tell it’s Time to Quit Your Job and Start Your Own Company”

back in the old country, anyone with a vision was considered a witchFormer NFL football coach Mike Shanahan said of professional football players, “If you’re thinking about retiring, you’re probably already retired.”

The same may be true for any career, particularly if you are thinking about starting your own business.  If you’re searching the Internet for ways to tell if it’s time to quit your job, you probably already know the answer to the question.

Many people switch jobs when they are unhappy, but comparatively few leave their jobs to pursue what they really want to do: start their own company.

It Has Been Done Before

Every business leader started at one low-level job or another. Michael Dell washed dishes at a Chinese restaurant before moving on to found Dell, Inc; David Oreck was a wholesale distributor for RCA before becoming one of the most recognizable faces in the vacuum cleaner industry. Former Vice President Al Gore invented the internet before he…never mind.

Are you destined to become a famous industry mogul? Perhaps not, but that doesn’t mean you can’t become a successful business owner. It’s entirely possible to transform your business vision into a successful company.

And it all starts with you quitting your dead end job.

Read the Signs

They may not even be that obvious, but there are signs that you are working at a dead-end job. Even if you don’t dread going to work in the morning, that doesn’t mean it’s not time to quit.

It’s not all about screaming bosses, not having a life outside of the company and co-workers whose presence is nauseating. Sometimes the signs are a bit subtler and can include:

Boredom

If your job isn’t challenging or is too repetitive, it can leave you feeling unfulfilled. Besides money, job fulfillment is one of the biggest things that people look for in a job. You should love your job, and you shouldn’t have to convince yourself to get up and go to work every morning.

Stagnation

Have you held the same position for years? When was the last time you learned a new skill? Jobs that teach you something new or provide a means towards a promotion are essential to feeling fulfilled at the end of the day. But sometimes we stay for too long with a company that simply passes us over for too long. When it gets to this point, it’s time to get out and make something happen for yourself.

Apathy

Do your eyes glaze over when you see the company motto and values? Does seeing the executives’ excitement at the future of the company make you stick your tongue in your cheek? If you just don’t care about the mission of the company, how is it possible to enjoy what you do every day? When you start your own company, something that you are passionate about, you will always leave work feeling energized and excited.

You’re Not Too Old

The average and median age of business founders is 40, according to a survey of 549 founders of businesses conducted in 2009. About 70 percent of these respondents also stated that they were married when they started their business, and about 60 percent said that they had at least one child (43.5 percent had two or more).

Still think that you are too old, too busy or too involved with your family to start a business?

If you have a dream, and the means to chase it, then you should do everything in your power to pursue it.

Grab Some Help Along the Way

Starting a business can be a daunting endeavor, but with the right tools, a few dedicated partners and enough determination, it can be done. If you have no idea where to get started, check out the Business is ART book.  It can help you take the initial leap towards becoming the successful entrepreneur that you’ve always wanted to become.

Be Prepared

A word of caution – don’t quit your job or wait to be let go from your employer to start preparing for your business. When you have no income, that’s the worst time to start planning. You start cutting corners and might even get in to panic mode, leading you to make the wrong decisions. Take some time. Draft your vision and strategy.

Think it through. Just don’t take forever. Give yourself a due date for the prep work.

Then go for it.

4 Secrets to Creativity

February 13th, 2016 Posted by Business is ART, Inspiration, Leadership, Vision 0 thoughts on “4 Secrets to Creativity”

creativityCreativity and inspiration. Where do they come from? The answer may be as unique as the individual providing it. In this excerpt from Business is ART, 4 secrets to creativity are suggested – for those times when it just doesn’t come naturally.

Business is ART Excerpt

“But this stuff doesn’t just come to me. My brain doesn’t work that way,” you might say [when challenged to develop a creative solution].

Just remember, any plan is ART [Articulate, Revise, Track] and anyone can be an ARTist. We just all have different methods. So find or create one that works for you. Here are some suggestions to help you along:

  1. Take time out. Set aside time to remove yourself from the shackled environment to just kind of free your mind. That could be literally or figuratively. Maybe an afternoon on the water. Maybe a walk on the bike path. Maybe yoga. Maybe a treadmill. Maybe lying down on your couch with no TV or distractions. Whatever works for you. I personally have to work at finding ways to make my mind just shut down for a while. Not thinking is one of the hardest things to do because there is always something going on up there. But I find some of my best ideas come to me in the shower, riding in silence in the car, floating on a boat, or at that point between being asleep and waking up in the morning: those times when my mind is not racing on any number of subjects.
  2. Brainstorm. Now, some people think the term “brain- storming” is old, tired, irrelevant, and even politically incorrect. The cool kids are trying out all kinds of alternative words for it, like “mind showers.” But it’s a fruitless religious argument. Call it whatever you want; it’s how you do it that matters. The one thing you want to avoid is “groupthink.” This is when the most vocal or senior people in the room dominate the idea-generation session and, due to either their volume or their title, everyone else becomes robotic and automatically says, “That’s a great idea.” Find a way that works for you and your group in which all voices are heard and all ideas at least get on the table for consideration. For me, that method is the trusty old yellow sticky pad, for two reasons. One, it gives everyone a voice and two, as previously stated, there is tremendous power in writing something down. A method you might try is to hand out yellow sticky pads to everyone and ask them to write single ideas on single pieces of paper for whatever the topic or question is. Set a time limit. I like one to three minutes, depending on what I have asked them to respond to. Then tell them “pens down” and collect it all. Now you can stick all the ideas up on the wall and even begin to categorize them before moving on to the next topic. This works for me, but you have to find whatever works best for you. Maybe it’s this. Maybe not.
  3. Reverse Engineer. In Double Double, [Cameron] Herold suggests starting with the end state in mind, then working your way backward to determine the path forward. Instead of saying, “First, I need this,” think, “Last, I need this. Right before it, I need that.” Go from point Z to point A rather than points A to Z in your planning process to avoid the trap of doing the same old things the same old ways, hoping you will get different results. J.D. Salinger said, “I am a kind of paranoid in reverse. I suspect people of plotting to make me happy.” While there is humor in this statement, it is also very profound and perfectly parallels what Herold is saying. Salinger’s destination in this case is people making him happy. Narcissistic? Maybe. Selfish? Perhaps. Clever statement? Definitely. He starts with the destination. So what is he likely to do? He is likely to start from that destination and consciously or unconsciously work his way backward, ultimately engaging and surrounding himself only with those people who make him happy.
  4. Don’t “exception handle.” It drives me crazy when we’re trying to figure something out and there is that one person in the room who constantly says, “Well, that only works if this is true.” Pretty soon, we are so deep down a rabbit hole that even the rabbit has to carry an oxygen tank. So if you can’t go from Z to A and just have to go from A to Z, then stay focused on getting to Z by assuming everything will work just fine. You can exception handle on the next few passes, but on the first go, just go.

Rebranding

January 25th, 2016 Posted by Business is ART, Business Plan, CEO, Engagement, Entrepreneur, Strategy, Vision 0 thoughts on “Rebranding”
rebranding infographic

Courtesy Wheelhouse Advisors

Rebranding and branding have been on my mind a lot lately. With a book, an online radio show, some new services and a lot more definition around what I do as a consultant, it’s a valid concern. I started independent consulting as SeaSeven LLC and used an online service to generate a logo, just to get something up and running without a lot of investment.

The Questions

A few months ago, I removed that logo from my website and any new marketing materials. Instead, the website now reads “Jon Umstead – doing business as SeaSeven LLC.” Is there any point continuing that practice of identifying myself? I’ll maintain the LLC for legal and contract purposes, potentially with a name change, but do I need to advertise it?

And what about the software I plan to release this year? It’s based off of the process and templates defined in Business is ART, but is it the Business is ART Software, BIA Software, or does it get a name all to itself unrelated to the title of the book that gave birth to it?

Seems Like All the Cool Kids Are Doing It

So many considerations when it comes to branding and rebranding, and I am certainly not alone. Almost all of the members of the CEO/Business Owner mastermind group I facilitate are at least giving it thought. Every day you read about another well known brand going through a rebranding effort, including complete name changes.

Just as the continual changes in everything that surrounds us drives us to require a constantly evolving strategic plan, it also drives us to continually ask “Do I have the right brand strategy?”

Do you?

How BIA Can Help Your Business Grow 30% Faster

January 20th, 2016 Posted by Business is ART, Business Plan, Goal, Strategy, Vision 0 thoughts on “How BIA Can Help Your Business Grow 30% Faster”

Everyone wants their business to grow quickly, but not everyone succeeds in doing so year after year. Sometimes growth seems to stagnate, leaving us wondering exactly what the key to business success is. How do we reach that moment of bliss when the needle begins to move in the right direction?

Is it sales and marketing, or perhaps strategy? Or is it some mystical secret that only a few know of?

growing your business is bliss

photo courtesy of gratisography.com

This question is brought up in the Business is ART book, and the answer really comes down to a single equation, an acronym, to be more precise. You see, running a successful business really is an ART.

  • Articulate your vision and plans
  • Revise plans consistently
  • Track your results

The Business is ART secret is that having a formal plan can help your business grow 30 percent faster. You just have to follow the three steps above in order to create and implement one. Throughout the course of the book, each one of these three steps is covered in great detail, but there are a few quick pointers that can be said about each one of them, just to give you a push in the right direction.

Articulate Your Vision and Plans

Everything starts with your vision, which is what you dream that your company can become. This can include both long and short-term plans, and can encompass everything from your goals, the strategies you have to achieve them and how you intend to move forward with your day-to-day operations.

The most important part about your vision is that you share it with your employees. Don’t just tell it to them, write it down. Create a strategic plan that is easy for each employee to understand and most importantly, let each and every one of them know how they fit into the overall puzzle.

Once you have your vision laid out, you can begin to see how fast your company can grow by making the right strategic choices.

Revise, Revise, Revise

Running a successful business is all about being able to adapt to change. Is something that you are trying not working? Try something else. Is there a new technology on the market that is helping companies grow? Implement it. You must constantly revise everything about your strategy and your goals in order to achieve the success that you’ve been looking for.

No strategy works indefinitely.

Track Your Results

The final step in the overall process is tracking your results. It is impossible to know if and how something is working if you are not keeping up with your KPIs and performance results. So long as you can figure out what metrics are worth tracking, you can track them in order to learn how to improve them.

Is it Really This Simple?

The idea behind Business is ART really is that simple, but the real determinant is how hard you are willing to work at building your business. Running a business is an art, but it is also science and work, and only you know if you are really up to the task.

By reading the Business is ART book, using the software subscription and following all the guidelines in the “Resources” section of the website, you truly can make your business grow faster than you can imagine.

While most softwares only focus on creating overly complex business plans, the BIA software and book focus on everything from creating a vision, painting the picture of your business, strategizing, business planing and tracking your performance metrics. And does it in a simplified manner.

Growing your business all starts with your vision and ends with your determination to make it happen.

How to Take Your Business Vision from Initial Ideas to Success

January 13th, 2016 Posted by Business Plan, CEO, Entrepreneur, Goal, Inspiration, Objective, Vision 0 thoughts on “How to Take Your Business Vision from Initial Ideas to Success”
Photo courtesy of gratisography.com

Photo courtesy of gratisography.com

Paying Homage to a Visionary

Earlier this week, music icon David Bowie died. The news and social media have rightfully been running all kinds of stories and tributes to him, and he was indeed influential in my life as well. Beginning in high school, I sang in bands but it wasn’t until a few years later I came in to my own as a vocalist. I distinctly remember it was in the middle of our cover of Bowie’s “Suffragette City”.

I was wearing these ridiculous all chrome glasses. Even the lenses were chrome so no one could see my eyes. We’re doing the song and I feel someone removing them from my face. That’s when I realized I’d had my eyes closed and was no longer seeing the crowd. I was just completely in to the song. I had zero thought nor care as to whether anyone was enjoying it or not. It simply didn’t matter because I was completely immersed in it…until that fan took off my glasses and momentarily brought me back to Earth.

It forever changed how I approached things. Fully immersing myself, not caring about what critics had to say.

People often mistook Bowie’s eyes for being of two different colors, but actually, they were the same color. One eye, however, was permanently dilated due to an injury from a punch to the face when he was a kid. This made it appear that his eyes were of two different colors, but it was just an optical illusion (every pun intended). Bowie actually used this distinct look to his advantage, recognizing that it gave him a certain visual mystique.

I think of it as giving him a unique view as a visionary, because whether you like his music and art or not, he was undeniably a visionary.

That’s a long lead in to this blog, but it felt right to pay some homage to one of the great artists of our time. Now let’s get down to the business of YOUR vision.

A Vision without a Plan

A company with a vision but no identifiable business plan is like a classic car without an engine. Sure, it’s beautiful to look at and sit in, and you can even imagine how fast it will go while racing down the highway, but once you turn that key to start the ignition, you’ll find that you are going nowhere pretty fast.

Without the building blocks to make it move, a car is really just a pretty hunk of metal.

This is how a lot of businesses start out: a vision is created, goals are set and the company decides on how to define success in their industry. This is a great start, but once the initial planning is over, too many businesses fail within the first few years. This is because defining success and formulating a plan to achieve that success are two very different things.

Make a Vision, Then Make a Business Plan

Your vision is what you want to achieve in your industry. Do you want to focus on innovation, customer service or quality products? Ask yourself how you want your company to be defined in the industry and what you want to do for your clients? This is your vision.

Your business plan is how you intend to achieve this vision.

Every company needs direction. Even the most talented team of experts needs direction, and you are just the person to lead that team.

Create a Strategic Plan

One of the things that the Business is ART book talks about is the one page strategic plan. This is a simple way to articulate and define the business objectives that you need to meet in order to achieve your vision.

Don’t know how to create a one page strategic plan? You’re in luck, there is a downloadable version of the template located in the “Freebies” section of this website. You can use this to plan, organize and track the progress that you are making on your business objectives.

Speaking of Tracking

How do you know if you are on the right path to achieving your vision? You track your performance results, of course.

Every business leader knows the benefits of tracking the company’s performance metrics. Without this crucial step in the process, you will never know in what areas you need to improve and where you should be staying the course.

The Next Steps

Achieving a vision is not a straight path, but a winding journey with many twists and turns. You have to be able to learn your industry and what it takes to run your business successfully. These lessons can be learned over time, and many of them are contained within the Business is ART book.

For more information, or to download the free templates, go to the Resources section of the website.

Start with a Plan this New Year

January 3rd, 2016 Posted by Behavior, Business is ART, Business Plan, Entrepreneur, Inspiration, Leadership, Strategy, Vision 0 thoughts on “Start with a Plan this New Year”
Vision, strategy, plan, business plan

Don’t Lose Sight

Bloated, tired and resolute. That’s how many of us feel as we ring in the new year – determined that this time the resolutions will stick. I WILL lose the weight. I WILL exercise regularly. I WILL get that job. I WILL start that business.

The year usually starts off with us going hard and fast after our resolutions, but within a few weeks for most, it turns back in to business as usual.

For me personally, it will be awfully tough to top 2015. I married the woman I love, which would have made it a great year if nothing else happened.

But a lot more did happen. I published a book and produced a musical that I’d written. I launched a new web site for the book, defined a new consulting service and started an online, on-demand radio program named after the book.

I also got a new hip, and although major surgery like that is no fun and I am still improving from it, I am looking very forward to walking again without pain.

Yes, 2015 was a good year. What will 2016 be like? Who knows? But a couple of good things in the plans include the marriage of 2 of our kids this coming Fall.

And there is the magic word – “plans.”

Whatever your resolutions or goals and objectives this year, without a plan for getting there, you’ll be making the same resolutions net year. No matter what you want to accomplish, it all begins with a plan.

Here’s to making this New Year the year you begin with a plan.

Plan Canvas is a community and a powerful software for improving your odds of business success and personal fulfillment.

© SeaSeven LLC 2017.
Developed with FRW Studios.